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April North Johnson County

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nojoco
APRIL 2015
A free community newspaper for the communities of
Oxford•Tiffin•North Liberty•Swisher•Shueyville•Solon•Ely
PRSRT STD
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
Permit #400
Iowa City, Iowa
north johnson county
FREE
NEWSLETTERS
The following communities,
organizations and schools distribute
their official newsletters through
North Johnson County:
North Liberty City ................page 4
Shueyville City .....................page 7
Swisher City ........................page 8
Solon Community Schools ... page 12
Solon City............................ page 14
Solon Senior Advocates ....... page 15
Ely City ................................page 17
&
Convenient Urgent Care Trusted Primary Care.
All under one roof.
1765 Lininger Lane, North Liberty
Urgent Care: 319-665-3073 Family Practice: 319-665-3053
www.mercycare.org/clinics
Isabella Smith jumps up and down with egg-citement as she waits
for the beginning of the Easter Egg Hunt– a brightly colored candy
bonanza– held March 28 at the North Liberty Recreation Center. The
free annual event was co-sponsored by the North Liberty Recreation
Department and the Optimist Club of North Liberty.
Hippity hoppity, Easter’s on its way
Kids and families line the North Liberty Recreation Center gym as
they wait for the signal to scoop up candy and treats. (photos by
Lori Lindner)
NORTH LIBERTY– On your
mark, get set….scramble!
It was another egg-ception-
ally well-attended Easter Egg
Hunt at the North Liberty Rec-
reation Center last Saturday,
March 28, as hundreds of kids
lined the two gymnasiums and
waited for the horn to sound
the start of the event.
Sponsored jointly by the
North Liberty Recreation
Department and the Optimist
Club of North Liberty, the free
egg hunt is usually scheduled
for outdoors, but frequently
held indoors because of cool or
wet conditions. Lacking grass
and natural terrain, the indoor
version is done with individual-
ly-wrapped candy strewn about
both gym floors so kids– sepa-
rated into age groups of those
5-and-under and 6-to-10 year
olds– can easily scoop the loot
into their baskets and bags.
Recreation Director Shelly
Simpson said there is no good
way to do a head count of par-
ticipants, but they planned for
about 425 kids.
“After sponsoring the event
from year to year, we look
to make sure most of the kids
are leaving with a good amount
of candy. We spent $1,635 on
candy for this year’s event, and
the Optimists assist with some
funds,” said Simpson.
She said parents like that
the event is held indoors
when the weather is cold or
wet outside, but also enjoy it
outside when Mother Nature
cooperates.
“Some ask about having tra-
ditional eggs, but that would
be a lot of work,” Simpson
said.
The event has grown from
year to year, indicating the
format is just ducky with most
parents.
“Individuals seem to walk
away happy, it goes fast– 2
minutes, 19 seconds, to be
exact– and cleanup is usually
a breeze afterwards,” Simpson
said.
Still time to sign up for
CCA Youth Football
TIFFIN– For those who missed
the sign up for the 2015 CCA
Youth Football season, there is
still time to get registered. Email
Bev Seelman at bev-jim-mba@msn.
com with your mailing address
and receive an application. Cost
for the season is $150 which in-
cludes six games and equipment.
Late registration starts July 1
when the fee increases to $175.
For those with questions, contact
Bev Seelman at 319-626-6155 in
the evening.
FILL THE
SHELVES
The North Liberty Community
Food & Clothing Pantry has
the following immediate
needs:
JELLO, OYSTER CRACKERS,
PEAS, CARROTS, SPRING
CLEANING SUPPLIES.
North Liberty Community Pantry
89 North Jones Blvd.
North Liberty, IA 52317
319-626-2711
www.northlibertycommunitypantry.org
Donation hours: 9AM-5PM weekdays
The Solon Food Pantry has
the following immediate
needs:
BAKED BEANS,
RAMEN NOODLES AND
HAMBURGER HELPER.
Solon Food Pantry
Pantry hours: Monday 2-6 p.m
Donations: Mondays 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
Phone: 319-430-8655
Located in the Solon United Methodist
Church
EASTER EGG
SCRAMBLE
SEE SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT
2 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
MEMBER
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Solon State Bank
www.solonstatebank.com
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REPRI NTED FROM THE MARCH 26 EDI TI ON OF THE NORTH LI BERTY LEADER
Kayak fisherman Scott Shrader of North Liberty cruises this kayak along Lake
Iowa. Shrader and other local kayak fishing enthusiasts are organizing a club
and a May fishing tournament. Find information on Facebook at Iowa Kayak
Anglers. (photo courtesy Scott Shrader)
Finding balance
in a kayak
Local kayak fishing enthusiasts cast
around for new club members
By Lori Lindner
NORTH LIBERTY LEADER
NORTH LIBERTY– If you think you
couldn’t reel in a 25-pound catfish in a
kayak, Scott Shrader would prove you
wrong.
Shrader, of North Liberty, has always
been a fisherman. As a child, he went
bass fishing with his father and com-
peted in fishing tournaments as he got
older.
He bought a kayak because he also
loved paddling around on the water,
and a kayak offered something a little
different.
“Kayaking a relaxing sport, and you
don’t have to deal with the gas and
maintenance and expense of having a
motor boat,” said Shrader.
It was a natural thing for him to put
the two sports together, and five years
ago Shrader bought his first kayak that
he could also take fishing. About two
years ago, Shrader learned that there
is a big movement in other states to
promote competitive kayak fishing
tournaments, and he dived in feet first.
His first tournament was on a cold
Halloween morning two years ago at
the Spooky Bass Tournament on Lake
Wanahoo near Omaha.
“At that point, I realized I was
hooked,” Shrader said.
In tournaments, fish are judged
on length rather than weight. When
Shrader competed in his second bass
tournament, his catch was big enough
to qualify him to compete in the Tour-
nament of Champions in Lake Fork,
Texas. There, he finished 22nd out of
58 competitors.
“People are getting more aware
of the kayak fishing industry,” said
Shrader. Cable television now airs
programs specific to the sport; Shrader
said he watched one fisherman land a
1,000-pound marlin in a kayak.
Fishing kayaks are designed dif-
ferently than those that traditionally
enclose the passenger. With top-side
seats, anchor systems, open cabins and
storage hatches for gear, they are also
built with a flatter hull and wider body
for increased stability. Their weight ca-
pacity is greater– usually between 350
and 500 pounds.
“You can even stand up in them just
like a bass boat,” Shrader said.
Cory Holland works at Fin & Feather
in Iowa City, and he personally attests
to the stability of fishing kayaks.
“Last summer, I had an Iowa (Hawk-
eye) offensive lineman standing up in
my kayak,” Holland said. “The only
drawback of their design is it makes
them a little slower.”
Shrader and Holland are working
together to create more interest in the
sport locally. Shrader founded the Iowa
Kayak Anglers club via a Facebook page
of the same name, encouraging online
conversations and inviting others to
join him in kayak fishing.
“I realized there is nothing for
competitions in this area,” said Shrad-
er. “Everything seems to be a five- or
Kayak fishing: Continued on page 6
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 3
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Tiffin Fire and First Responders
pancake breakfast on April 12
TIFFIN– Tiffin Fire and First Responders will host
their annual pancake breakfast Sunday, April 12, at
the Tiffin Fire Station. Pancakes, eggs, whole hog sau-
sage, cinnamon rolls and Clear Creek Orchard Jams
will be served from 6 a.m. to noon. There is no cost
associated however free-will donations are encour-
aged.
The money raised by the firefighters and first re-
sponders has been used to purchase protective safety
equipment, medical gear and even fire trucks in the
past.
This year donations will be used toward paying off
a Kubota unit, purchased as a quick response vehicle
for hard to reach areas during fire and medical emer-
gency situations.
REPRI NTED FROM THE APRI L 2 EDI TI ON OF THE NORTH LI BERTY LEADER
By Lori Lindner
NORTH LIBERTY LEADER
NORTH LIBERTY– Travis Whitmore feels he has
learned a lot about life through playing sports and
growing up in America’s heartland: a strong work ethic,
perseverance, teamwork and respect for others.
Today, he is applying those life lessons to teach oth-
ers about financial management.
Whitmore recently opened a new office as an Edward
Jones financial advisor. Located at 550 Pond View Dr.,
Ste. C., Whitmore is ready to meet customers at their
convenience.
Originally from Burlington, Whitmore graduated
from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in
economics. There, he played baseball and was named
to the Academic All-American team. But Whitmore was
interested in finance long before college, or even high
school.
“From a young age, I enjoyed watching the markets
and how they act and react to different events,” said
Whitmore. “I remember taking a baseball trip when I
was 14, and I was reading ‘Stock Markets for Dummies’
when everyone else was playing their Game Boys®. I’ve
always been interested in growing your money, and how
much little moves can make in the long-term.”
After graduation, Whitmore played three years of
minor league baseball with the San Deigo Padres. His
career in baseball has taken him to 10 different states to
work and live, yet Iowa is where he has chosen to make
a permanent home, close to family and friends.
“I have moved all over the country, and I know this is
where I want to be and run my office,” said Whitmore.
“I’m excited about the opportunity to grow this business
and be part of this community.”
Edward Jones is a full-service financial brokerage
firm. The five main services Whitmore offers as an Ed-
ward Jones advisor are:
• retirement planning for individuals and businesses
• money and income management during retirement
• advice on a variety of investment products and
vehicles
• funding plans for education expenses
• insurance products to help plan for the unexpected
Whitmore said his clients range in their understand-
ing of financial investments, from the very experienced
to those with no experience at all.
“We pride ourselves in face-to-face interaction. You
don’t have to call a 1-800 phone number or get online
to do the research yourself,” said Whitmore. And he is
happy to meet clients at their homes, at a local coffee
shop or in his office.
“We educate people as well as providing advice.
Whether you are in your first job out of college and
have that student loan debt, or if you are further along
in your professional career and are ready to start invest-
ing, we will put an individualized plan in place for each
type of investor because everybody has a different risk
tolerance, different time horizon and different goals.”
Edward Jones specializes in meeting individuals
where they are at any given moment, said Whitmore,
and staying in touch with clients personally.
“We like to stay in contact with our clients, because
we understand life changes– it could be a birth or
marriage or other life event– and we want to be there
because your financial picture could change. And if we
aren’t monitoring that, we can’t do what’s in your best
interest,” Whitmore said.
In addition to the personal touch, Whitmore believes
in Edward Jones’ strength and business practices as a
company.
“We work with numerous products partners, which
means we can scour the investment universe for what
we think are the best quality funds, the cream of the
crop. We aren’t tied to one specific fund family or in-
vestment type,” Whitmore said. “That’s always going to
be in your best interest.”
As important as it is for advisors to know their cli-
ents, Whitmore said it is equally vital for people to ask
questions about their advisors and the company.
“There are no bad questions. The most important
thing in any relationship is the trust aspect,” Whitmore
said. “My job is to put clients at ease by educating them
what they are getting into and showing the power of
investing, through the market ups and downs. We are
serious about quality, long-term investments here.”
Todd Nash, Regional Leader for the firm’s Region 8
area, said he is excited to have Whitmore on the Edward
Jones team in the new North Liberty office.
“That is a new branch office for us, and it’s great to
have a presence in the North Liberty community,” said
Nash. He said he has worked side-by-side with Whit-
more and has seen him in action.
“One thing I’ve noticed is Travis has a great attention
to detail. You can tell he cares about what he is doing
for his clients. Not only is Edward Jones benefiting
from having a great person like him on the team, but
the community and Johnson County will benefit from
having him there as well,” said Nash.
Information is available on the Edward Jones website
at www.edwardjones.com, but details are somewhat
limited for a reason, Whitmore pointed out.
“We feel there is only so much that can be learned
over the phone and on the Internet,” said Whitmore.
“We like to meet with people face to face and really get
to know the person before we can understand what is
best for them.”
The Edward Jones firm has been around for 90 years.
One reason for the company’s success is the way it sup-
ports not only clients but its advisors as well.
“If there are ever questions I can’t answer, I have the
best support system in the industry,” said Whitmore.
Edward Jones connects new investment advisors with
more experienced advisors in order to ensure consis-
tency of service, and supports its local offices with a na-
tional network of Edward Jones professionals to provide
a wider range of resources.
“I don’t think every firm’s philosophy is like that,”
said Whitmore. “I don’t believe anyone knows all the
answers, but I have a whole team of people around me
that I can work with to come up with the best answer
for an investor. That’s one of the best things about
Edward Jones; everybody wants everybody to succeed
here.”
Whitmore said having mentors to look up to, whether
as a young player on the baseball field or joining the
Edward Jones team, has been invaluable in helping him
develop the strong character and ethics he now brings
to his career. It has also inspired his goal of getting
involved in youth sports as a coach or a mentor himself.
“They helped me grow, not only as a player, but as
a person, and it’s important for me to give back,” said
Whitmore. “I know the power that can have on kids’
lives. It’s great to see the kind of difference you can
make.”
Whitmore playing on a strong team
Former baseball player opens NL office
as Edward Jones investment advisor
Travis Whitmore.
4 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
NEWSLETTER
Recreation Center: 626-5716
Library: 626-5701
City Hall: 626-5700
Swim Lessons Begin
Next session begins week of April 7.
REC CENTER UPDATES
REMINDER—TREE AND SHRUB TRIMMING
For visibility and safety, trees and shrubs along public
rights-of-way must be kept trimmed as follows:
• Trees– to a height of 13 feet above a street or alley and
to a height of 8 feet above sidewalks
• Shrubs– to provide a 2 feet clearance from the edge of
a sidewalk or curb.
• Walkers, runners, roller bladers, etc. may call City Hall if
they encounter tree limbs or shrubs overhanging sidewalks
and a personal reminder will be sent to property owners.
SPRING LEAF PICKUP
Open burning of leaves and yard waste is not permitted
in North Liberty. The City will pick up leaves that property
owners have raked to the curb on April 6 and April 13.
For safety reasons, no leaves should be placed in the
street. Leaves should be piled within two feet of the curb or
edge of road. The vacuum hose can only reach that far.
Do not bag leaves. The vacuum cannot pick up bags.
No sticks and branches should be mixed with the leaves.
The vacuum hose cannot accommodate sticks and branch-
es. Brush or garden waste may be bundled for pickup on
regular trash day. Two bundles will be picked up at no
charge each week. Bundles should be no more than 4 feet
in length and weigh no more than 40 pounds. Other yard
waste can be picked up curbside in bags with a yardwaste
sticker affixed. Place the bag curbside on regular garbage
pickup day.
Pickup schedule:
Leaves must be between the sidewalk and curb or within
two feet of the edge of the street on the following days:
• By 7 a.m. on Monday, April 6
• By 7 a.m. on Monday, April 13
Each morning, the public works staff will begin picking up
leaves at 7 a.m. until all the streets have been checked
once. If staff is unable to cover all streets in that day, the
pickup will continue daily for the remainder of the week or
until all streets have been serviced.
Spring Cleanup Day
for North Liberty Residents
Saturday, April 25
7 to 11:30 AM
Spring Cleanup Day is for residents of North Liberty only.
Please be prepared to verify that you are a North Liberty
resident with a water bill stub or driver’s license. North
Liberty residents pay $.30 each month on their recycling bill
for this service.
Miscellaneous large items are to be brought to the Public
Works Facility, 620 Calvin Street. (Go south on Front Street
to Golf View Drive. Turn right and go to Calvin Street. Turn
right to Public Works facility.)
The following items will be accepted:
• Furniture and other bulky items.
• White goods (appliances)
• Brush and tree limbs
• Tires and batteries (car & truck)
• Metal and car parts
• Electronics
Dumpsters will be delivered on Saturday morning and each
type of refuse will have a designated location.
Assistance will be provided to the elderly or handicapped.
Please call City Hall (626-5700) by April 24 to make
arrangements.
Regular household trash, paint and toxic materials will
not be accepted. A permanent drop-off site for paint and
other hazardous materials has been created at the Iowa
City landfill. Items may be dropped off by appointment
each day.
BLUES & BBQ INVITES VENDORS TO APPLY
Grill maestros and other food vendors can apply to be part
of the Adam Schechinger State Farm Food Vendor Alley at
the ninth annual North Liberty Blues and BBQ presented by
South Slope Cooperative Communications, scheduled for
Saturday, July 11, in North Liberty’s Centennial Park.
Last year, an estimated 10,000 guests from across the
Corridor came to North Liberty to listen to live music, enjoy
family-friendly activities and eat a smorgasbord of delicious
food including traditional barbecue favorites such as ribs,
pulled pork and burnt ends and other treats such as ice
cream, kettle corn, frozen yogurt, cupcakes and more. This
year promises to be even better.
Applications are available at northlibertyblues.org/food and
are due by 5 p.m., April 24. Spaces are limited.
North Liberty Blues and BBQ offers fun for all ages includ-
ing mouth watering food, live music, arts-inspired kids’
activities, local craft beers and more. For those seeking
additional information, visit northlibertyblues.org.
SUMMER LUNCH PROGRAM SEEKS SPONSORS
The North Liberty Summer Lunch and Fun Program is
seeking participation from local restaurants and others to
help provide free food and activities for North Liberty youth
weekdays June 8 through Aug. 14.
The 2015 program will provide a free nutritional lunch for
kids up to age 18 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., and free
activities from noon to 1 p.m., on the lawn of the Ranshaw
House, located north of the North Liberty Community
Center at 520 W. Cherry St. The program will not be offered
July 3. No registration is required.
The program served more than 2,500 free meals for chil-
dren last summer.
The program is sponsored by the North Liberty Unity
Coalition, with food, volunteer and activity support from the
North Liberty Community Library and recreation staff, the
community pantry, area churches, residents and business-
es. All donations are tax-deductible through the nonprofit
North Liberty Community Betterment Fund, which accepts
donations on the program’s behalf.
Visit the website at http://nlsummerlunch.wordpress.com.
SUMMER PROGRAM BROCHURE NOW AVAILABLE
The North Liberty Community Center’s summer brochure,
covering program and events held May through August, is
now available.
The cover features the Just Tri! Youth Triathlon, now in its
fourth year and scheduled for Aug. 2. Highlights include
the Great American Backyard Campout at the Community
Center on June 27, a Cedar River kayaking trip on July
25 and the annual Doggie Plunge on Sept. 10, when
the outdoor pools are open to canine companions and
benefiting the Cedar Valley Humane Society.
Also included is the second summer of the Summer Lunch
& Fun program, which provides a free lunch and activity to
community youth weekdays from June 8 to Aug. 14.
The North Liberty Community Library highlights its summer
reading program, which begins May 18 and has a kick-off
party May 20 at Hills Bank and Trust’s Zeller Street. This
year’s program themes include “What’s Your Power?,”
“Behind the Mask,” and “Escape the Ordinary.”
The library also highlights its family-friendly A Very Frozen
Tea Party and adult-only Neon Prom events in May.
The program and events brochure is available online, at
the Community Center and in this NoJoCo newspaper.
CITY NEWS
FACILITY HOURS
Monday – Friday: 6 AM – 9 PM
Saturday & Sunday: 8 AM – 6 PM
(CLOSED Sunday, April 5, for Easter)
Registration for most
programs begins April
6, with most programs
starting the week of May
4. Patrons can register
in person or online at
northlibertyiowa.org/rec.
y
OUTDOOR FAMILY PURSUITS
Do you know that the Recreation Department offers various
items FREE to assist families in getting outdoors?
•Geocaching with a GPS unit
• Fishing pole rental
A deposit is collected and refundable upon return of
undamaged equipment. Contact Jason at 626-5716 or
jegly@northlibertyiowa.org for more information.
Community Gardens
Plots are available at the Meade Barn, east of the Penn
Meadows Sports Complex on a first-come, first-served
basis Plots are 10 × 30 feet. A hydrant is available for
water, but no hose hook-ups are allowed; must use buckets
to transport water to plot. Fee per plot: Residents $30,
Non-res $35.
Planting may begin by May 1. Plots cleared by Nov. 1.
Register in person at the NLRC only on Friday, April 10,
beginning at 6 a.m.
Summer Pool Pass Discounts: Purchase your summer
pool passes in April, and receive a 10% discount. (May
through summer; regular rates).
Free Swim Lesson
The North Liberty Aquatic Center wants you to enroll your
child in a free swim lesson. We want everyone to enjoy a
fun, safe summer. To jumpstart, this lesson teaches basic
skills and safety tips around water. One session per child.
Registration ends when maximum number is reached.
Ages: 3-12
Friday, June 5
9-9:30 AM or 9:30-10 AM
Lifeguard Class
Become an American Red Cross-certified lifeguard.
Must be able to swim 200 yards freestyle and 100 yards
breaststroke, tread water for 2 minutes, and do a timed
brick test to complete the pre-test. Must receive 80
proficiency on written exam. Fees: Res $160; Non-res
$165 per person. (Work Memorial Day through Labor Day
and get your class fee reimbursed).
Must be at least 15 years old by last day of course
Lifeguard Pre-test: May 5; 7-8 PM
Lifeguard Classes: May 8; 5-9 p.m.; May 9; 8 AM – 6 PM;
and May 10; 8 AM – 6 PM
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 5
Recreation Center: 626-5716
Library: 626-5701
City Hall: 626-5700
SHELF LIFE
By Jennie Garner
Library Director
REC CENTER UPDATES continued from page 4
APRIL LIBRARY EVENTS
www.northliberrtylibrrarrryyyyyyyyyyy....oorg • 319-626-5701.
Library Update
Join us in April for two fantas-
tic author visits at the library
(details under adult programs
listing). On April 13, we’ll host
Linda McCann, author and
historian. She’ll talk about the
subject of her book, “Prohibition
in Eastern Iowa.” McCann is the
author of many historical books.
More information about McCann
is available at http://www.iowa-
centerforthebook.org/authors/
browse/mccann-linda.
On April 21, the North Liberty
Community Library in partner-
ship with the Marion Public
Library has the honor of hosting
All Iowa Reads author, Robin
Oliviera, for a discussion of Ol-
iviera’s book “My Name Is Mary
Sutter” (2010). This book was
honored as the All Iowa Reads
title for 2015. In this historical
novel, Mary Sutter is a brilliant,
headstrong midwife from Albany,
New York, who dreams of
becoming a surgeon during the
Civil War. We hope you’ll join us
to welcome Ms. Oliviera from
Seattle.
NLCL comes to the Pantry
A reminder that we are bringing
the library to the community be-
ginning in April! The North Liber-
ty Community Library is excited
to partner with North Liberty
Food & Clothing Pantry to offer
a pop-up library branch. Staff
will be at the food and clothing
pantry two days a month (on
a scheduled Tuesday and a
Thursday from 3-5 p.m.) offering
library services. Visitors can sign
up for library cards, check out
materials and request items. If
you know of other locations who
would like to partner with us
to offer these services, please
contact Library Director Jennie
Garner. Contact information is
listed below.
A Fantastic February
Even though it was a short
month, we had 13,999 people
visit the library in February. Our
computer use was 2,619 and
1,400 people used our database
resources. We love to see so
many people using our services
and are grateful for your
support. Thank you to all of our
patrons for using the library!
As library director, I had the
honor of being invited to present
for career day to fourth and fifth
graders at North Bend Elemen-
tary in March through Workplace
Learning Connections. It was
a pleasure to speak with the
students there. They were a
respectful and impressive group,
asking great questions and
showing interest. I asked them
what they thought librarians
did every day and they gave
insightful answers. One little girl
excitedly raised her hand and
said, “You make people happy!”
I loved hearing that and hope
that everyone feels welcome
and has a wonderful experience
at the North Liberty library. That
is truly the best part of our job.
Case in point, while I was
preparing for this school visit, I
asked the staff what was their
favorite part of the job. All
resoundingly agreed that con-
necting people with what they
are looking for in the library is
the best thing. We hope you find
what you are looking for each
time you come to the library.
April Programming
This month’s programming
is listed to the right, and the
library’s Summer Reading Pro-
gram is just around the corner.
The library staff strives to
provide services and programs
tailored to meet the needs of
community members and area
residents. While it may not be
possible to adopt all sugges-
tions, we welcome your input.
Please contact Library Director
Jennie Garner with suggestions,
questions or concerns at 319-
626-5778 or email jgarner@
northlibertyiowa.org.
Questions?
More programming information
and the current program bro-
chure is available online at www.
northlibertyiowa.org.
If you have general questions
about upcoming programs or
library services, please call 319-
626-5701 or visit our website.
• Tough Talk Discussion Group: Thursday,
April 16. Topic is the Death Penalty. Attend-
ees can find suggested discussion materials
at the library for this lively discussion group
that is topic based rather than discussing a
single book title.
• BYOB (Bring Your Own Book): North
Liberty Chapter: Friday, April 24, 5:30 p.m.
This discussion group brings local restau-
rants and books together. April’s read is “The
Tour” by Jean Grainger and the discussion
will be held at Rocky O’Briens Public House.
The book’s main character, Conor O’Shea,
collects a new group of American visitors
each week from Shannon Airport from where
they embark on a high end tour of the ‘Real
Ireland.’ But this particular tour, with its
cast of unintentionally hilarious characters,
presents seasoned tour guide Conor with
dilemmas that render him speechless for the
first time in his life.
• Last Tuesday of the Month Book Club:
Tuesday, April 28, 6:30 p.m. Join us for a
discussion of George Orwell’s “1984.”
NOTE: Additional copies of books and materials
for book/discussion groups are available at the
library on a first-come, first-served basis.
• Aaachoo: Allergies! with CarePro Phar-
macy: Thursday, April 23; 6:30 p.m.
If you have allergies, this is the program for
you.
TECH TOPICS
• Download with Confidence
April 8, 1:30-3 p.m.
April 10; 9:30-11 a.m.
• Government Info on the Web
April 14,1:30-3 p.m.
April 16; 9:30-11 a.m.
• Calling All Questions!
April 22; 1:30-3 p.m.
April 24; 9:30-11 a.m.
For more information on technology classes
or to make an appointment for individual
technology help, contact Janet Lubben,
Technology Librarian, at 319-626-5701.
FAMILY & TODDLER PROGRAMS
• My Baby Story Time (0 to 24 months):
Tuesdays, 10 a.m.
• Tot Time (2-4 years): Fridays, 10 a.m.
• Storytime(Pre-K): Wednesdays, 10 a.m.
• PJ Storytime (family): Thursdays, 7 p.m.
NOTE: Though we have recommended ages for
storytime, we encourage you to try them all and
see what fits best for you and your family.
• Family Movie Night: Friday, April 10, 6
p.m. Call the library for information on this
feature about a little boy who has a very
bad day and his family. Bring pillows and
blankets for your viewing comfort. You are
also welcome to bring snacks and covered
beverages. Popcorn provided,
• Donuts & Robots: Saturday, April 18, 10-
11 a.m. Family fun program building robots
with common craft supplies. We will have all
the boxes and recycled goods to build with
but you are welcome to bring any supplies
you want to use to create your robot. Dough-
nuts and juice provided.
YOUTH & TEEN PROGRAMS
• Crafternoons (K-5th): Tuesdays, 3:30-4:30
p.m.
• Lego Thursdays (K-5th): First and third
Thursday, 2:30-4 p.m.
• Throwback Wednesday (teen): second
and fourth Wednesday, 5 p.m.
ADULT PROGRAMS
• Sociable Seniors: Mondays, 10 a.m.
• Just for Fun Hand Crafts: Tuesdays, 7
p.m.
• Visiting Author: “Prohibition in Eastern
Iowa” with author Linda McCann: Monday,
April 13, 6:30 p.m. (See more information in
library update).
• Visiting Author: 2015 All Iowa Reads book
“My Name is Mary Sutter,” Robin Oliveira:
Tuesday, April 21, 6:30 p.m. This event is a
Cultural Corridor partnership with the Marion
Public Library (more info in library update).
Zombie Apocalypse Survival Camp
Join local experts John Watson and Guy Cain of the Zom-
bie Apocalypse Survival Camp (ZASC) on Saturday, April
18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the North Liberty Recreation
Center, as they demonstrate how to use survival skills
during the impending zombie apocalypse. Training will be
provided on survival gear, fire building, emergency shelter
construction, water collection and water filtration. Partici-
pants will trek outdoors away from the recreation center in
search of wild edibles..
Sign up today by calling 319-626-5716 or register online at
apm.activecommunities.com/northlibertycommctr/Home.
ZASC encourages family participation. Bring the entire
family and learn together. Bring a sack lunch and spend the
day learning some valuable outdoor skills. Register ahead
of time with the North Liberty Community Center.
Fee is $35 for ages 13 and older. Kids ages 13 and under
are free when accompanied by an adult.
Registration deadline is Friday, April 10
PRESCHOOL PROGRAMS
Parent / Tot Workshops
Join this workshop where set up and clean up are done
for you. You and your child will be engaged and have fun
with others. Make & take craft of day along with a variety
of other activities. Instructor: Stephanie Fiser. Fee: $6 per
session, per child. Saturdays; 3-4 PM.
Ages: 1 - 5 years Registration Deadline:
May 9: Bird’s Nest ......................................... May 4
May 23: Dreamcatcher .................................. May 18
June 6: Father’s Day Paperweight ................ June 1
June 20: Patriotic Pasta Art ........................... June 15
July 18: Birdhouse ........................................ July 13
August 1: Paint Fun ...................................... July 27
August 15: Robot .......................................... Aug. 10
Ballet/Creative Dance
This program is designed to introduce a child to dance
basics, develop a love for dance and an appreciation for
music. Students must be at least 3 years old and potty
trained. Recommended shoes/attire: leotard, tights, leather
ballet slippers. Ages: 3-4 years old
Wednesdays; 5:30-6 PM or 6-6:30 PM
Registration/Information: Contact Lyndsay at 319-648-4091
or lwilkinsonkrotz@hotmail.com.
Lucky Duck Morning Swim
A special morning open swim time for caregivers and young
children. Safety and supervision is needed; if caregiver
cannot provide adequate attention to children they may be
asked to leave or bring additional help. We recommend 1:1
ratio for 2 years and under; 1:5 ratio for 3 years and up;
Ages 5 and under should always be within arm’s reach.
Fee:$1 per child; pay at front desk
May 1-29; Fridays, 9-11:30 AM
June 6-August 29; Saturdays, 9-11:30 AM
YOUTH PROGRAMS
Youth Art Workshops
Get kids excited about art over the summer. Each class
includes a make it, take it craft and kids will have fun in
an interactive activity or game. Be sure to dress youth in
clothes to get messy! Instructor: Stephanie Fiser
Saturdays; 1:30-2:30 PM. Fee: $8 per session, per child
Ages: Grades K-6 Registration Deadline:
May 9: Flower Box / Float Boats ................... May 4
May 16: Space / Balloon Rockets ................. May 11
May 23: Robot / Minute to Win It ................... May 18
June 6: Wind Chime / Giant Bubbles ............ June 1
June 13: Nature / Balloon Ping Pong ............ June 8
June 20: God’s Eye / Minute to Win It ........... June 15
June 27: Make own Fooseball & Play .......... June 22
Youth 3 on 3 Basketball League
Officiated 3-on-3 basketball league for boys & girls, grades
5-8 based on 2015-16 school year. Team-oriented program.
All games are played 5:30-9 PM, on different days. Fee:
$125 per team.
SS: June 15-July 13; Boys, Grades 5 & 6, Mondays NLRC
SS: June 16-July 14; Boys, Grades 7 & 8, Tuesdays BG
SS: June 18-July 16; Girls, Grades 5 & 6, Thursdays NLRC
SS: June 19-July 17; Girls, Grades 7 & 8, Fridays BG
Registration Deadline: May 31
Tae Kwon Do: Adults & Children
Learn self control, self confidence, discipline, courtesy and
self defense. This activity is for the entire family. Ages: 6
years and up. Monday and Thursday; 5:30-7 PM. Fees
range between $42-$59, or $7 drop-in fee if not full.
SS1: May 4 – 28 (No class May 25)
SS2: June 1 – 29
SS3: July 6 – 30
SS4: Aug. 3 – 31
FAMILY PROGRAMS
Outdoor & Nature Education (O.N.E.) Packs
Backpacks stuffed with fun activities are available to help
children and their families explore the outdoors. Packs can
be checked out for two weeks and taken to local parks
or natural areas. Themes include: birds, animals of Iowa,
trees, insects, outdoor skills, aquatic habitats, creatures of
the night, and more. Pack rental forms must be completed
and a credit card number will be taken for deposit. Any lost
or broken items will be charged to the credit card on file.
IT”S FREE!
6 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
OVER 40 ARTS, CRAFTS,
AND VENDORS TO SHOP!
Family Day
Saturday 12-4pm
Carnival including games, prizes,
face painting, and balloon twister.
Annual Old Capital Extravaganza
For more
information email
oldcapshow@gmail.com
April 17 (10-6pm) & 18th (10-5pm)
at Old Capital Town Center
MANY RAFFLE
ITEMS TO WIN
Scott Shrader of North Liberty with one of his kayaks designed especially for fishing. Shrader and some of his fishing friends have
organized the Iowa Kayak Anglers club to encourage others to try kayak fishing. (photo by Lori Lindner)
Kayak fishing: Continued from page 2
six-hour drive or more. And I thought,
we could do this, we have great lakes
around here.”
Several years ago, Shrader said, it
was harder to find kayaking equipment
in the area. Now, Seatasea Watersports
Center in Cedar Rapids, Fin & Feather
in Iowa City and Scheels in Coralville
all carry kayaks, and most kayak
manufacturers offer models designed
for fishing. Some even make tandem
kayaks for two passengers. Shrader has
become a pro-staff member for Wilder-
ness Systems kayaks, Anchor Wizard
and Golden Baits lures; the companies
sponsor his activities, and in turn, he
introduces the sport of kayak fishing to
people in the Midwest. Since November,
the Iowa Kayak Anglers’ Facebook page
has garnered at least 100 inquiries, and
a few of the members have held initial
meetings to brainstorm more ideas
about how to grow the sport.
The Iowa Kayak Anglers club is
organizing the first-ever kayak bass
fishing tournament on Lake Macbride
scheduled for this May; it will also be a
qualifying tournament for competing
in the Tournament of Champions in
Texas.
But you don’t have to be a competi-
tor to enjoy kayak fishing. Holland said
it is the perfect way for even beginners
to get out on the water and do some
fishing.
“You can enter the sport at whatever
your budget allows,” Holland said. He
advises beginners to look for some-
thing with a lot of stability, and to
consider the bodies of water they will
be paddling. Ten- to 12-foot kayaks are
nice for rivers and lakes, while longer
boats do better on coastal waters, like
the Gulf of Mississippi, where Hol-
land was raised. Many kayaks are self
draining, so if it does flip it while in the
water, they are easy to right and easy to
drain. Holland’s wife even swims from
hers, he said, and is able to easily get
back into the craft by herself.
Shrader also noted the conveniences
of kayaks over motor boats.
“It’s a fairly inexpensive sport. You
don’t have to have a huge bank account
to get started,” he said. “You can get a
fully out-rigged kayak for $500, or you
can go above and beyond that if you
want to.” Shrader’s kayak is equipped
with a fish finder, mounted rod holders
and a sliding track-based system that
keeps gear in place with bungee-like
cords, among other amenities that
make it easy for him to carry enough
equipment to pack for a five-day
camping and paddling trip. But fancy
accessories aren’t necessary, he said,
especially for beginners.
Further, kayaks are quite portable,
even for one person.
“You don’t necessarily need a boat
ramp; you can drag this to the bank,
and you can’t do with a $20,000 bass
boat,” said Shrader. “If you only have a
couple hours to fish it’s easy to get in
and out. You don’t have a ton of gear,
you don’t have to license kayaks under
the 12-foot limit, and you don’t need a
trailer. You can put them on top of an
SUV; I’ve even seen one on top of an
Escort wagon.”
And no boat storage is required; a
garage will do. Shrader also said unlike
a boat, kayaks are covered under most
homeowner’s insurance without a sepa-
rate rider.
Holland encourages anyone inter-
ested to visit the outdoor expansion of
the Iowa City sporting good store, Fin
& Feather H2O, located on Sand Lake at
the Terry Trueblood Recreation Area.
Watercrafts of all sorts are available to
rent, but there are also paddle demon-
stration days where people can just
try out the kayaks, canoes or paddle
boards.
Sharder said he also would be
pleased to introduce anyone to the
sport of kayak fishing.
“We are more than happy to take
anybody out. I have several kayaks peo-
ple are welcome to try,” Shrader said.
“It’s relaxing, it’s easy and it’s a lot of
fun.”
Holland especially likes the way kay-
aks bring a paddler closer to nature.
“You really get in tune with the
water,” said Holland. “You can get to a
lot of nooks and crannies boats can’t
access, even in flooded timber. You can
be completely secluded, or get a little
sun and get a little wet. It’s absolutely
a blast.”
Find Iowa Kayak Anglers on Face-
book, or email Shrader at shrades@
outlook.com.
North Bend PTG to
host 5K, 1-mile fun run
Saturday, April 11
NORTH LIBERTY– The North Bend
Elementary Parent Teacher Group (PTG)
will host the second annual, fami-
ly-friendly 5K and 1-mile Fun Run on
Saturday, April 11.
The 5K will begin at 9:15 a.m., and
the 1-mile Fun Run will begin at 10 a.m.
Both events will start and end at North
Bend Elementary School, 2230 St. An-
drews Dr., North Liberty. There will be
color stations along both routes.
Prior to April 9, race entry is $20 per
person or $60 for a family of four; each
additional family member is $10. Race
day registration is available for $25
per person. Participants registered by
April 1 will receive a free event T-shirt.
Registration is available on getmeregis-
tered.com. Paper registration forms are
available by emailing NBE5KRun@gmail.
com.
The Fun Run is one of the main
fundraising events for the PTG, a sup-
port group for the school and educa-
tional activities. All Fun Run profits
will be used to purchase items for the
school that are not covered by the reg-
ular school budget (i.e. books, guided
reading programs, classroom technolo-
gy, playground equipment, enrichment
programs, field trips, school supplies,
etc.)
NL Pantry holding ribbon
cutting and tree planting
for new garden April 25
NORTH LIBERTY– Join the North
Liberty Community Pantry for a ribbon
cutting and tree planting event to open
the new Garden for Health project on
Saturday, April 25, from 1-3 p.m., at
89 Jones Blvd. in North Liberty. The
community is welcome to attend this
event where organizers will unveil the
winning garden name submission and
recognize the winners of the contest.
Volunteers will be planting fruit
trees, preparing garden beds for spring
planting, hosting a variety of kid friend-
ly activities and more. Light refresh-
ments will be provided. The event will
occur rain or shine; if the weather is
poor, the event will be held inside the
Pantry.
“This event is a great opportunity for
community members to take part in the
creation of the garden and take home
information from local experts about
starting their own gardens,” said Ilsa
DeWald, Garden Coordinator. “Above
all, it will be a fun, interactive way to
gather as a community.”
Individuals seeking more informa-
tion about the event should visit www.
northlibertycommunitypantry.org/
garden/ or join the Facebook event at
www.facebook.com/NorthLibertyCom-
munityPantry .
Those seeking to volunteer at the
event should attend Garden Volun-
teer Orientation on Wednesday, April
15, from 1-3 p.m. at the North Liberty
Community Pantry, sign up by emailing
garden@northlibertycommunitypantry.
org.
NORTH LIBERTY–
North Liberty SHARE is
a non-profit volunteer
food-buying group that
specializes in quality
food at unbelievable
prices. Through SHARE’S
unique food network,
money is saved by
stretching grocery dol-
lars. Each month SHARE
offers seven new food
packages and four addi-
tional items at a low cost.
The Best Value pack-
age cost is $25, this
month, which includes:
18 ounce Farmland pork
tenderloin, 12 ounce beef
and pork meatballs, 9
Order SHARE IOWA April food package today
ounce Kroger deli roast
beef, 1 pound jumbo all
beef franks,16 ounce
spaghetti, 26 ounce pasta
sauce and fresh seasonal
assortment.
Also offered is a $21
Breakfast Box package
including: French toast,
bacon, hash browns,
sausage patties, individ-
ually wrapped breakfast
flatbreads and Honey
Buns.
The Meat Bundle for
$28 is great for gradu-
ation parties, summer
picnics or to stock your
freezer. See our website
for the complete meat
list.
Orders are due April
10 or online by April 12.
Participants can pick
up orders on April 25
between 10-11 a.m. at the
North Liberty Community
Center.
Order forms are also
at the North Liberty
Community Library.
Participants are urged
to visit the website at
shareiowa.org for all our
packages offered. Orders
can be placed online or
by calling 800-344-1107,
or contact Carmen at
the local site at 319-626-
3455.
REACH OVER 13,000 HOMES BY ADVERTISING IN
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 7
SHUEYVILLE CITY COUNCIL MEETING
Shueyville City Council Meeting
March 10, 2015
Mayor Markus Cannon called the regular
monthly meeting of the Shueyville City
Council to order at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
March 10, 2015, in the council chambers
at the Shueyville Community Center.
Present: Markus Cannon, Mayor, Mickey
Coonfare, Brent Foss, Chris Lacy (left early),
Pam Larson, Jerry Cada (arrived later) and
Teresa Eadie, Clerk/Treasurer
Absent: none
Citizens Present: Peg Becicka, Mark Story,
Bryan Bredman, Steve Kass, Deric Powell,
Johne Bere, Jerry Spaight, Connie Semo-
ton, Shaun Kekrtee, Mike Sattler, Neil Eru-
sha, Glen Meisner, Kelsey Boone, Hannah
Williams, Briannia McAtee, Gabi Carter, Ali
Morrow.
Motioned by Coonfare, seconded by Foss
to open the Public Hearing to hear com-
ments on the FY16 Budget, roll call, All
Ayes, motion carried 4-0
Mayor Cannon questioned if anyone had
comments, none.
Motion by Larson, seconded by Foss to
close the Public Hearing, Roll Call, All Ayes,
motion carried 4-0.
Citizen’s Comments: A citizen asked about
the steps taken to get him the information
he requested and why the document was
not found. It was explained that a thorough
search was made for the requested docu-
ment and that the requested document has
never been seen by the current Mayor or
the current City Clerk as the document request-
ed was from a previous administration and
filed at time when the past clerk was suffering
from illness. It was requested that citizen’s
comments from February’s council meeting be
expanded to include more details and felt that
they were not a true representation of com-
ments made from a citizen. An issue was also
raised in regards to links on the City website
not bringing up correct information. The city
clerk reported that the error had been noticed
and corrected.
Consent Agenda: No comments on Agenda.
Updates requested for the minutes of February
10, 2015, minutes. No comments for Sum-
mary of Claims or Treasurer’s Report. Sheriff’s
report, 18 dispatches: 6 traffic, 4 suspicious/
criminal/theft, 2 phone request, 3 medical and
3 bar checks. A sign permit for Connie’s Barber
Shop was reviewed and approved. Coonfare
motioned, seconded by Foss, to approve the
consent agenda consisting of the Agenda, Min-
utes from the February 10, 2015, with updated
comments, Summary List of Claims, Johnson
County Sheriff’s Report, Permits, Licenses,
and Treasurer/Clerk’s Report. All Ayes, motion
carried 4-0.
Employees: Coonfare asked if weekly renters
were mailed the updated $25 late fee infor-
mation. Zumba instructor will end classes this
month due to schedule/personal conflicts.
Coonfare also asked about replacing her as
contact person for center rentals. Citizen
suggested a local resident. It was also dis-
cussed about the bank sign and who can put
messages on it. It was suggested that the sign
owner be in charge of maintaining it. Mayor
Cannon shared the cost to replace light bulbs
for outside lights and will add it to next month’s
agenda. It was mentioned that Living Roadways
Grant is available for beautification projects,
such as 120th St.
Old Business: Motioned by Foss, and second-
ed by Larson to approve the Resolution No.
2015-6. Resolution authorizing Mayor and
City Clerk to sign documents to resolve Solon
State Bank’s Letter of Credit issue involving
construction of Southview Lane, a Memoran-
dum of Understanding and Mutual Release
between the City of Shueyville, Iowa, Lakewood
Development Homeowner’s Association and
Solon State Bank and rescinding Resolution No.
2014-14. Roll call, All Ayes, motion carried 5-0.
Motion by Coonfare, seconded by Cada to
approve Resolution 2015-3 adopting the Annual
Budget for the Fiscal Year 2015-2016. Roll
Call, All Ayes, motion carried 5-0
Resolution 2015-2 Approving Final Plat of
Jacob’s Landing Third Addition was discussed
and determined that a letter of credit is needed
to confirm that the roads will be seal coated. It
was also agreed that a Development Agree-
ment was necessary and would be presented
at the next council meeting for final approval
consideration. Motioned by Coonfare, and
seconded by Larson to table till next month.
Cada presented and idea for the city sign and
asked the sign company come to the next
council meeting.
Motioned by Cada, seconded by Coonfare
to approve Resolution 2015-5 Contract for
Community Center Rentals All Ayes, motion
carried 4-0
New Business - Resolution 2015-4 Approval
Final Plat of Maplewood Second Addition was
discussed. It was determined that an easement
is required on the Final Plat to connect
Sunset Drive to any future road develop-
ment. Motioned by Foss, and seconded by
Coonfare to table till next month. All Ayes,
motion carried 4-0
Motioned by Cada and seconded by Coon-
fare to table Knox Box and Sign Ordinance
till next month. All Ayes, motion carried 4-0
Motioned by Coonfare, seconded by Larson
to set Public Hearing for April 14, 2015 for
Ordinance 12-18-14-01 A Ordinance Adopt-
ing by Reference and Providing Amend-
ments to the 2014 National Electrical
Code, Including Annex H-Administration and
Enforcement. All Ayes, motion carried 4-0.
It was requested that the City Clerk post
ads and send out lawn mowing bids to past
applicants.
Mayor and Council will look into the over-
grown bushes on the bus route and talk to
owner.
Motioned by Foss, seconded by Cada to
approve Clerk Training. All Ayes, motion
carried 4-0
Correspondence: Mayor will review Living
Roadways Grant for beautification projects.
Announcements: none
Coonfare moved to adjourn the meeting,
seconded by Foss. All Ayes, motion carried
4-0. Meeting adjourned at 8:30 p.m.
Markus Cannon, Mayor
Teresa Eadie, City Clerk/Treasurer
NOTICE OF LAWN CARE BIDS
City of Shueyville
The City of Shueyville is now accepting lawn mowing and trimming
proposals for 2015 to the Shueyville Community Center/City Hall.
Bid forms may be obtained by calling city hall at 319-848-7626
between the hours of 9 a.m. and noon, Monday thru Thursday or by
emailing Shueyville@southslope.net. Bid forms are due to City
Clerk by 11 a.m. April 13, 2015.
The Heart of the Corridor
S HU E Y V I L L E
SHUEYVILLE CITY OFFICE 319-848-7626
2863 120TH ST NE, SWISHER
WWW.SHUEYVILLEIA.COM
IOWA CITY– Traffic has been restricted to a single
lane with stoplight control at the Mehaffey Bridge
over the Iowa River/Coralville Reservoir in unincorpo-
rated Johnson County. A maximum vehicle width re-
striction of 9’6” will be in place at the bridge location
during this phase of the construction.
The road will remain open to traffic, but travelers
should expect potentially lengthy traffic delays, espe-
cially during the morning and afternoon peak travel
hours. The contractor hopes to complete this phase
of construction in July.
Please consider an alternate route or plan for ad-
ditional travel time, and always be patient and drive
defensively through work zones.
The project involves demolition of the nearly
50-year-old Mehaffey Bridge and completion of the ve-
hicle-lane portion of the new Mehaffey Bridge deck.
Construction of the sub- and super-structure of the
bridge and trail portion of the new deck was com-
pleted over the past two years with minimal effect
on traffic by using accelerated bridge construction
techniques.
Iowa Bridge and Culvert, LC of Washington, Iowa, is
the prime contractor. The awarded contract price was
$8,904,245.24.
Please go to the Road Construction Updates link
on the Secondary Road Department page of www.
johnson-county.com for updates on this and future
projects. You can follow Secondary Roads on Twitter
at JCSecondaryRoad.
Mehaffey Bridge down to a single lane
with width restrictions into summer
CCA Community Clean-up Day
Friday, April 24: Sign-up now
TIFFIN– Clear Creek Amana (CCA) is holding its
annual Community Clean-up Day on Friday, April 24.
Students from the Student Assistance Team and Na-
tional Honor Society will volunteer their day to help
older community members with yard work, windows,
small household chores and general spring cleaning.
CCA will be sending students out to work for half
days in the morning, half days in the afternoon, or
full days. Students will arrive for their assigned jobs
at 8:30 a.m. and will leave for lunch at 11:30 a.m.
They will arrive for afternoon jobs by 12:30 p.m. and
will leave by 3:15 p.m. This is a great day for the kids,
who really enjoy giving back to the community.
Sign up now for kids to come help with projects.
Please call 319-545-2361 or 319-545-5623 and leave
a name, address, phone number, description of job,
how many student workers will be needed and wheth-
er you want a.m., p.m., or full-day workers. Call by
April 20 to reserve help. Rain date will be May 1.
NORTH LIBERTY–
North Liberty Youth Base-
ball and Softball (NLYBS)
is raising funds to help
build the sports pavilion
at Penn Meadows Park in
North Liberty.
The pavilion will
house separate male and
female restrooms, a con-
cession stand, covered
picnic area and storm
shelter, and be used by
the NLYBS league and
other area and regional
leagues hosting week-
end tournaments. The
non-profit organization
has pledged $250,000 to
the project, in addition
to seeking grant funding,
and Scheels All Sports
has committed $25,000.
The City of North Liberty
is on board to help fi-
nance the rest of the esti-
mated $500,000 building
cost. League organizers
hope to have the building
ready in time for use this
summer.
There are several
ways to participate in the
project, including private
monetary or in-kind do-
nations, business or cor-
porate sponsorships, or
by ordering an engraved
brick for the “Commemo-
rative Baseball Diamond”
courtyard to be incor-
porated into the project
design.
NLYBS board member
Cindy Hill encouraged
the entire community
to be part of the project
by ordering an engraved
brick.
“This is a great op-
portunity to honor your
son, daughter or a special
coach. Just as diamonds
are forever, you may also
wish to forever preserve
the memory of a loved
one or friend, or a special
event such as your team
winning a tournament or
having a great season by
purchasing one or more
commemorative bricks,”
Hill said. “What a nice
way to permanently and
proudly recognize your
player or business.”
NLYBS is entering its
23rd year of operation. In
2014, the summer league
served 894 players ages
four through 13 years,
with additional players
coming from the Solon
and Coralville and anoth-
er 80 children playing
in the fall ball league.
NLYBS had nine volun-
teer board members, 269
volunteer coaches and
hired more than 20 um-
pires to officiate games.
The league offered 16
scholarships to players
unable to afford registra-
tion fees.
Those interested in do-
nating, becoming a proj-
ect sponsor or ordering
a commemorative brick
should visit the NLYBS
website at ezteams.com/
NLYBS, email registrar.
nlybs@gmail.com, or call
319-665-8394.
Step up to the plate: Donate to NLYBS fundraiser for concessions, restrooms
8 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
“If you have a garden and a library, you have every-
thing you need.”
– Cicero
Easter Egg Hunt April 4
Come join us for the big Easter Egg Hunt. Saturday,
April 4, at the Castek City Park. The hunt goes off
right at 11 a.m. so make sure all kids (ages 0-10) are
there with baskets ready.
You shop. Amazon gives.
Are you an Amazon shopper? Love to get that box of
goodies delivered right to your door? Did you know
that you can shop at home and help support your
library? Amazon donates 0.5% of the price of your el-
igible purchases to the charitable organization of your
choice when you shop at smile.amazon.com. Same
products, prices and service.
It’s easy. Just sign into your Amazon account at
smile.amazon.com and select JEFFERSON MONROE
FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY as the organization you
want to support. That’s it. No cost to you and you help
support your local community library.
Open Hours
Monday-Thursday: 4-8 p.m.
Saturdays: 10 a.m.-noon
Or if the Open Flag is up … come on in!
Story Time
Thursdays, 6:30 p.m.
April 2: Hoppy Easter
April 9: Opposite Day
April 16: Love My Library
April 23: Tooth, Tooth, Teeth
April 30: Spring Games
Stories, songs, crafts, games and other fun!
Book Club April 21
Our book for April is “Standing in the Rainbow” by
Fannie Flagg.
Along with neighbor Dorothy, the lady with the smile
in her voice, whose daily radio broadcasts keep us
delightfully informed on all the local news, we meet
Bobby, her 10-year-old son, destined to live a thou-
sand lives, most of them in his imagination; Norma
and Macky Warren and their 98-year-old Aunt Elner;
then there is Tot Whooten, the beautician whose
luck is as bad as her hairdressing skills; Cecil Figgs,
the Funeral King; and the fabulous
Minnie Oatman, lead vocalist of the
Oatman Family Gospel Singers.
The time is 1946 until the present.
The town is Elmwood Springs, Mo.,
right in the middle of the country,
in the midst of the mostly joyous
transition from war to peace, aiming
toward a dizzyingly bright future.
Once again, Fannie Flagg gives us
a story of richly human characters, the saving graces
of the once-maligned middle classes and small-town
life, and the daily contest between laughter and tears.
Fannie truly writes from the heartland, and her story-
telling is, to quote “Time,” “utterly irresistible.”
Books are in now. Stop in a pick one up and then join
us for the discussion on Tuesday, April 21, at 7 p.m.
Book Marks
erties from Division St. to B. St, from Central Ave. to
Summit Ave., from Swisher View Dr. to Summit Ave.,
from Division St. to 5th St., from Swisher View Dr. to
Essex Ave. and from 3rd St. to Hilltop Rd.
Zoning for 215 Summit Ave.: Kakacek explained this
property was rezoned to BC but never updated to the
map several years ago. Per Kakacek, the city attorney
recommended the council to either update the map or
have P & Z review and make recommendation to council.
Council agreed to update the zoning map for 215 Summit
Avenue SE from 2RM (Residential Multiple Family) to
BC (Business Commercial) as was previously approved
by ordinance.
A public hearing to amending billing for sewer service
was done and 1st Reading of Ord.#245 to amend billing
for sewer service was done. After approval of final read-
ing, billing will change to monthly and due the 20th of
each month starting July 2015.
Public Notice to discuss penalty rate
charge for delinquent sewer accounts
was done. After discussion, council
agreed to leave penalty rate at $15
per month and possibly review in six
months.
A public hearing to adopt 2015-16 Budget
was done and Council adopted 2015-
2016 Budget.
Council Set Public Hearing Date to Consider Adopting
SUDAS (Statewide Urban Design and Specifications) for
April 13, 2015, at 7 p.m. at City Hall.
Council Set Public Hearing Date to Consider Adopting
Key Lock Box System Ordinance for April 13, 2015, at 7
p.m. at City Hall.
Council appointed Dean Sturtz and Ron Riggle to Board
of Adjustment.
Council decided to forgo having a community wide
cleanup this year.
Council Set Work Session Dates for Codification Review
starting at 6 p.m. for March 16, April 6, April 20, 2015.
Mayoral Proclamation: Mayor Taylor told Council
about American Cancer Society’s “80% by 2018” goal
to increase screenings for colorectal cancer. He signed
pledge on behalf of the City and will issue a proclama-
tion to be posted in the usual places.
March 9
Swisher
City Council
meeting
highlights:
City adopts new comprehensive plan
and 2014-15 city budget
REPORTS:
Library Director Laura Hoover noted when residents
purchase items on Amazon, they can participate on
SMILE.Amazon and one-half of one percent of the sale
can go the library.
Engineer Report: City Engineer Cutsforth noted the
right-of-way and easement ordinance is ready for attor-
ney to review. He went over the proposed SUDAS and
commended the SUDAS Committee for all their hard
work.
Mayor Report: Mayor Taylor noted the gas tax in-
crease will bring approximately $14,500 more income
for road use. In honor of Employee Recognition Day,
Mayor Taylor thanked Craig Vondracek, Dean Teslik,
Dennis Hromidko and Tawnia Kakacek for all their work
they do for the City. He also thanked Laura Hoover for
all the work she does for the library.
Council Reports: Svec expressed safety
concern as emergency vehicles couldn’t
get through certain streets when Legion
had activities for the last three weeks.
People are parking on the streets that
have “No Parking” on them. Vondracek
will install yellow signs on those no park-
ing areas on Friday night before event.
Employees’ Reports: Vondracek noted
they are done with inside work and will be
cleaning and doing maintenance of sewer
plant, taking down snow fence, getting
mowers ready, and filling potholes in streets. Kakacek
reported the new website is about ready, just waiting for
pictures and has been reviewing city insurance coverage
with agent.
Council passed Small Wind Energy Conversion System
Ordinance.
Fun Days street closures and street dance were ap-
proved.
A public hearing for Adoption of Comprehensive Plan
2013-2023 was done and Council adopted 2013-
2023 Comprehensive Plan.
A public hearing to adopt 7RS (Residential Single) Dis-
trict was done and Council adopted 7RS District was
passed.
A public hearing to rezone certain properties in Swisher
from 12RS to 7RS was done and 1st Reading of Ord.#244
to Rezone to 7RS from 12RS was done. This is for prop-
Phone: 319-857-4539
Fax: 319-857-4529
E-Mail: swisher2@southslope.net
City of Swisher
66 Second Street
P.O. Box 279
Swisher,Iowa 52338
New City Office Hours:
Mondays 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Fridays 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
News
W.I.L.O.S. Bake
Sale & Bunny
Breakfast
Saturday, April 4,
9-10:30 a.m.
Swisher Savings Bank &
Trust
To sign up for a garage sale, fill out the
form available at Swisher City Hall or
the Swisher Library or email swish-
er2@southslope.net. Form must be
turned in to city hall by April 20.
Garage sale maps will be available
Thursday, April 30, at city hall.
The Swisher American Legion Auxil-
iary is doing a community service project
after the Garage Sales on Saturday, May
2. If you have leftover items that can go to
Goodwill or the Salvation Army, you can
bring them to the Legion on Saturday, May
As it will be getting warm soon and resi-
dents will want to get rid of their brush and
garden debris, it is a good time to review the
city regulations and considerations.
1. Consider where the winds will send
your smoke, especially if you have neigh-
bors that are sensitive to the effects of
smoke.
2. Burn during daylight hours only.
3. Attend your fires at all times.
4. Honor neighbor’s request if they ask
you not to burn.
5. Recycle. Recycle. Recycle. If it can be
recycled, don’t burn it.
6. Allowed: Recreational fires, landscape
waste, and yard waste.
7. Not Allowed: petroleum based products
(such as Styrofoam, any form of plastic,
waste oil, kerosene, oil filters, baby diapers,
etc.), grass clippings, pressure treated
wood, creosoted wood, common household
garbage or any item you suspect would emit
a lot of smoke or odor.
8. Don’t leave a fire smoldering. If you’re
done burning, put it out.
9. All yard waste shall be separated by the
owner or occupant from all other solid waste
accumulated on the premises and shall be
composted or burned on the premises or
placed in acceptable containers and set
out for collection. Yard waste stickers are
available at City Hall for $1.50 each and
each sticker is for a 39-gallon capacity with
40-pound weight limit. Questions: Contact
city hall at 854-4539 or Johnson County Re-
fuse 1-877-423-9877 or get on city website
at www.swisheria.org.
CITY OF SWISHER OPEN BURNING REGULATIONS
2, from 3 to 6 p.m. and a truck will come on
Monday or Tuesday, May 4, or Wednesday,
May 5, to pick up the items. We hope this
will help those who would have to make
a trip to Goodwill or the Salvation Army.
Thanks for supporting our American Legion
Post and the American Legion Auxiliary.
If you have questions, please call Dorothy
Teslik at 319-857-4365.
CITY WIDE GARAGE SALES
Saturday, May 2, 2015, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
April 5: Easter Sunday
April 6: Legion Meeting,
6:30 p.m.
April 12: District Junior
Spring Conference, 11:30
a.m.-2 p.m.
April 13: Auxiliary
SWISHER AMERICAN LEGION UPCOMING EVENTS
Meeting, 6:30 p.m.
April 18: 1st District
Spring Conference at
Columbus Junction.
April 22: Earth Day!
Juniors meet at Legion 4
p.m. for clean-up party.
April 25: Hunters
Safety Course at Legion;
Information online, Iowa
Department of Natural
Resources.
City Wide Cleanup
Saturday, May 9, from 7 to 11 a.m. at emp-
ty lot east of city hall. Must show proof of
residency. Contact City Hall for questions.
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 9
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By Lori Lindner
NORTH LIBERTY LEADER
TIFFIN– Tim Long has a favorable first impression of
the City of Tiffin.
“I was really knocked out by the trail program that is
going on here, and there has been active seeking of grants
to further support that. I understand there is a parks
development program in place,” said Long, referring to
the city’s hiring a consultant to plan future park spaces.
Hired as Tiffin’s Interim City Administrator after the
January resignation of former administrator Michon Jack-
son, Long began his position Feb. 16. He identified several
positive things about the community.
“It was a prudent move to build a new city hall. There is
a solid and active emergency responder and volunteer fire
department in the community, and that is really important.
I think it is a good-looking community.”
As interim, Long anticipates only being here for three
to four months while Callahan Municipal Consultants
searches for a permanent replacement. Jackson suggested
the council consider Long (along with another candidate)
to fill the gap between her departure and the new hire
because of his experience.
Long has served as the city administrator for the cities
of Geneseo and Morrison, Ill., and Cascade, as well as
Housing Director for Project NOW, Inc. in Rock Island.
He is one among several former city administrators
around the state who are retired but willing to accept
short-term assignments such as this.
“I can take the knowledge and experience of 20-some
years, and step in and have a good, hit-the-ground-running
understanding of what is going on,” said Long. “It is a good
way to fill in without having to make the commitment to
living in a community for two to five years. I’m not looking
for long-term commitments at the age of 63, but it really
does suit my interest.”
Geneseo was Long’s first administrator position after
earning his master’s degree in public administration
from Northern Illinois University in 1992. He was there
for nearly six years before moving to Morrison, and later
to Cascade, where he retired last April. He took just one
summer off before being called upon to fill a vacancy
in Geneseo while they went through the process of an
administrator search.
“I thought it would be gratifying and interesting,” said
Long. “That was my first interim position.”
Long said the demand for interim city managers prob-
ably occurs more frequently in smaller communities that
don’t have assistant city managers or administrative staff
in place who can easily absorb duties. He said his prepara-
tion when stepping into a community primarily consists
of talking with the staff, mayor and city council members
about what action happened in the last few months, and
determine what issues are most pressing.
“It really is a fairly short look back, and then you start
putting the piece together. In Tiffin’s case, the priority is
getting a budget passed,” Long said. “You can’t look back
too far, because you can get buried in history.”
Mayor Steve Berner remarked prior to Long’s installa-
tion that an interim city administrator will have the luxury
of being brutally honest with city administration and staff
about areas for improvement in city operations; without
a contract to renew, the need for diplomacy is lessened,
he reasoned.
However, Long said his honesty will always be tempered
with humility.
“I understand folks here have gotten to the point they
are through the incremental steps they have taken; that
care and thought have been given. I respect what com-
munities have done to get where they are, and staff and
council have worked hard and tried their very best for
their community,” Long said. “(An interim) could step in
and sound too heroic or raise alarms, and I don’t like to
do that.”
Long said he had only anecdotal accounts of Tiffin’s
growth boom before coming to town.
“There is a lot of pressure here for development. I ha-
ven’t seen anything like it since I was an intern in Sugar
Grove, Ill. They were expanding and building lots and
moving as fast as developers all around were pressing
them to, and they did run into trouble,” said Long.
His goal is to create a smooth path for a new admin-
istrator to step readily into the fast pace Tiffin’s growth
has generated.
“I hope to sand down the rough edges so the person
stepping in can do the work instead of having to pick up
pieces or clean up messes,” said Long. “I hope to set an
example, to be clear about what the city council can expect
of staff and what staff can expect of council; to not create
unrealistic expectations for either my position or for what
we can do in the months I am here.”
Long said his plan is to do a lot of listening, reflecting
and sharing the experiences he has had.
“There have already been occasions where something
The Long and short of it
REPRI NTED FROM THE MARCH 12 EDI TI ON OF THE NORTH LI BERTY LEADER
Tim Long of Davenport is serving as Tiffin’s Interim City
Administrator while the consulting firm Callahan Munic-
ipal Consultants seeks a permanent replacement. (photo
by Lori Lindner)
Tiffin interim: Continued on page 19
10 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
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SOLON– Although Brett Smith passed away nearly
three years ago, his memory is still going strong in
the hearts of his friends, family and community.
The son of Jeff and Carmen Smith of Solon, Brett
was diagnosed with Acute Myloid Leukemia in Jan-
uary of his senior year at Solon High School. He was
treated at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
but was later sent to the MD Anderson Cancer Center
in Houston, Texas, and passed away there on April
16, 2012.
In 2014, Sarah Drea and Brady Smith, first cousins
of Brett, organized a running and walking event in
honor of their family member.
The event was such a success that the Second An-
nual Brett Smith Memorial Run/Walk will be held on
Saturday, April 11, in Solon.
“It’s just a way for us to remember him and share
in his memory,” said Drea. “It’s something that’s not
sad. We just thought it would be a good way to keep
his memory out there, get together, and celebrate his
life.”
Keeping the memory alive
Second Annual Brett Smith Memorial Run/Walk to be held April 11
REPRI NTED FROM THE MARCH 19 EDI TI ON OF THE SOLON ECONOMI ST
The Brett Smith Memorial Run/Walk will start and
finish at the Solon American Legion ball diamond
pavilion.
Race participants must pre-register at brettsrun-
solon.org no later than Wednesday, March 26, to be
guaranteed a T-shirt. Additional T-Shirts can be or-
dered at the race website for $15. Interested runners/
walkers do not need to be pre-registered in order to
participate. There will be no T-shirts for participants
registering on race day. Race day registration and
check-in for pre-registered participants will be from
8:30 to 9:30 a.m. at the Legion ball diamond pavilion.
The Brett Smith Memorial Run/Walk will feature
both a kids’ One-Mile Fun Run for children ages 12
and under, and a timed, 5K run.
The registration fee for the Fun Run, which begins
at 10 a.m., is $15. Prizes will be awarded to the top
three finishers.
The 5K starts at 10:45 a.m. and $100 prizes will be
awarded to the first male and female finishers and
$50 prizes awarded to the second place male and fe-
male finishers. The cost to register for the chip-timed
5K is $30.
Packet pick-up for pre-registered participants will
Brett Smith Memorial: Continued on page 16
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 11
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SOLON
Amazing to others
Kathy Kaldenberg at the Lakeview Elementary School Library. (photo by Jen Moore)
SCSD Media Specialist Kathy Kaldenberg
to retire after 12 years of service
By Jen Moore
SOLON ECONOMIST
SOLON– “Obvious to you, amazing to
others.”
It’s the title of a YouTube video by
entrepreneur Derek Sivers that de-
scribes how ideas that seem so simple
and, well, obvious, to one person could
be mind-blowing and awe-inspiring to
someone else.
It’s a quote that Solon Community
School District (SCSD) Media Specialist
Kathy Kaldenberg tries to remember
each day. She’s used it on her blog and
has posted the video to her Twitter ac-
count as a reminder to everyone about
what they have to offer the world.
“I started sharing small things about
what we were doing at Solon Commu-
nity School District and was surprised
when other people thought our ideas
were interesting or unique,” Kaldenberg
REPRI NTED FROM THE MARCH 19 EDI TI ON OF THE SOLON ECONOMI ST
said. “That is why it is so powerful to
share what we do.”
But what she probably doesn’t
realize is how accurately that quote
describes how special and valuable
Kaldenberg has been to Solon for the
past 12 years.
“Kathy is kind of a dreamer and a
doer and go-getter,” said Matt Towns-
ley, Director of Instruction and Tech-
nology for Solon schools. “She’s really a
one-of-a-kind person.”
Kaldenberg will retire from her posi-
tion as Librarian and Media Specialist at
the end of this school year. It’s a loss,
Townsley said, that the entire district is
going to feel.
“It’s going to be very challenging to
fill that role,” he said. “We would prob-
ably need to hire three or four more
people to do what Kathy does.”
And what she does is everything.
Kaldenberg is more than a stereotyp-
ical idea of a librarian– one who checks
out books to students and maintains
the libraries. She’s been at the forefront
of technology utilization since she
took the position. As someone who’s
naturally curious and a self-described
“nerd,” she’s always been on the look-
out for new ways to engage students
and employ new tools to aid in their
learning.
Kaldenberg said students today live
“in an ocean of digital access” and it is
the responsibility of educators to make
sure they are able to use it in the best
and most ethical ways.
One of her first projects involved
Lakeview Elementary students using
first generation iPods to record mini-re-
views of some of their favorite stories.
Kaldenberg uploaded the book talks
onto the school’s online database so
other students could listen.
Since then, she’s helped Solon stu-
dents Skype with classrooms around
the country for National Read Aloud
Day, connected fourth graders with
a former employee of the Library of
Congress for a lesson on civil rights,
and had community members of all
ages participate in Hour of Code, an
event that encourages anyone to learn
computer science.
That’s just the tip of the iceberg.
She’s collaborated with teachers at
the elementary, middle school and high
school to bring new tools to their class-
rooms. One of her favorites is a project
using the work of Kenn Nesbitt, a poet
and the creator of the website, poetry-
4kids.com.
She and students wrote Nesbitt to
obtain permission to use his work- a
lesson in copyright laws- and once the
kids had selected their poems, they
chose music from a royalty-free data-
SOLON– The public is invited to
discuss the proposed extension of the
Hoover Nature Trail in Johnson County
on Tuesday, April 7, between 5:30 and
7:30 p.m. at Solon City Hall Council
Chambers, 101 N. Iowa St. in Solon.
All interested persons are invited to
attend this meeting anytime between
5:30 and 7:30 p.m. to discuss the pro-
posed extension of the Hoover Nature
Trail in Johnson County between Solon
and Ely.
The meeting will be conducted in
an open forum format. Johnson Coun-
ty Conservation Board and staff from
its consultant, McClure Engineering
Company, will be present to informally
discuss the proposed trail extension.
No formal presentation will be made.
The meeting space is accessible for
persons with disabilities. However,
those who require special accommoda-
tions at the meeting should notify Brad
Freidhof, Johnson County Conservation
Program Manager, by March 31. Call
Freidhof at 319-645-2315, or email
bfreidhof@co.johnson.ia.us.
Public information meeting on Hoover Trail
extension to be held in Solon April 7
Kaldenberg: Continued on page 18
12 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
Empty Bowls Luncheon to End Hunger
On Saturday, April 11, the Solon High School Art
Club will be hosting the Sixth Annual Empty Bowls
Luncheon to End Hunger in the Solon High School
Commons.
Since its inception in 2010, the
event has raised nearly $12,000 for
hunger-related charities and organi-
zations. The luncheon has become
an eagerly-anticipated spring event
for the local community and sur-
rounding areas.
Guests will be served a modest
lunch of soup and bread in a ce-
ramic bowl handmade by a student,
educator or community member
for a suggested minimum donation
of $10. Guests are encouraged
to keep the bowl with our compli-
ments and sincere gratitude. All money collected will
be donated to the Johnson County Crisis Center,
Food Bank and Solon Food Pantry. Advance tickets
available beginning April 6. For additional information,
contact Joshua Koza at jkoza@solon.k12.ia.us or
visit the Solon High School Empty Bowls web page
at http://solonarts.weebly.com/empty-bowls.html.
624-3401
Solon Community
www.solon.k12.ia.us
School District
CALENDAR REMINDERS
MIDDLE SCHOOL HIGH SCHOOL
Financial Literacy Fair
On Wed., April 22, 8th grade students will participate
in the Financial Literacy Fair at the Coralville Public
Library. To prepare for the fair, students research ca-
reers based on their interests using the IHaveAPlan
web-based program. Students choose a career along
with an entry-level salary that they will use at the fair
to find housing and transportation
while maintaining a monthly budget.
The fair culminates with students
meeting with a financial advisor to go
over their budgets and assess the
feasibility of their financial choices.
Spartan Dash 2015 will be held
Saturday, April 25.
First heat begins at 8 a.m. and the last at
11:50 a.m. Entry forms are due NO LATER
than MONDAY, APRIL 6. Please go to the
Lakeview Virtual Backpack for the start time
applicable for your family.
Fourth Annul Spartan Dash... Rain or Shine!
Friday, April 3– No School- Good Friday
Thursday, April 9– 1:45 p.m. Early dismissal
Thursday, April 16–1:45 p.m. Early dismissal
Thursday, April 23–1:45 p.m. Early dismissal; High
School P/T Conferences (4-7:30 p.m.)
Thursday, April 30–1:45 p.m. Early dismissal
School Board
The April meeting of Solon’s Board of Education will
take place Monday, April 13, at 6 p.m. in the High
School Media Center.
Non-Public Transportation Reimbursement
This is a reminder to those families who qualify for
non-public transportation reimbursement. Forms
must be filed in the Central Office by May 1, 2015, for
second semester reimbursement. Forms are avail-
able at the Iowa Department of Education website:
https://www.educateiowa.gov/pk-12/school-transpor-
tation/nonpublic-reimbursement. Or the forms may
be picked up in the SCSD Central Office. Failure to
submit your request by the May 1 deadline will result
in the denial of the reimbursement request for the
claim period.
Driver Education Meeting April 1
There will be a Driver Education parent meeting at
5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 1, in the Solon Audi-
torium.
This is an opportunity for Instructors to briefly explain
the summer program and to answer questions. Driver
Education at Solon Community Schools is a rigorous,
systematic, and comprehensive program. We provide
students with opportunities to learn about best prac-
tices on the road, to assess their competence and to
practice a variety of those skills. We encourage you
to compare our program to other programs in the
area. Taking Driver Education through the school dis-
trict can also provide you with a tax benefit. We think
you will see a difference in our program.
If you have any questions about the program, please
e-mail Roger Thompson at rthompson@solon.k12.
ia.us or Dale Jedlicka at djedlicka@solon.k12.ia.us,
or call 624-3401 x 1321 or x 1333. Hope to see you
there.
Summership Application
The Summerships Committee awards scholarships
for cost of the camp or activity (up to $250)
to enable young people to participate in summer
activities. SummerShips are awarded to Johnson
County students (K-12) who are eligible for Free &
Reduced Lunch.
Please use a separate form for each applicant, even
within the same family. A copy of the requested camp
or program registration or flyer must accompany the
application. The completed application should be
submitted to:
Summerships
c/o CFJC
325 E. Washington Street
Iowa City, IA 52240
Direct questions to Community Foundation of John-
son County, info@communityfoundationofjohnson-
county.org or 319-338-9958. Submissions must be
received or postmarked by Friday, May 15. Applica-
tions will be reviewed in the order they are received. Fourth annual Spartan Dash April 25
Lakeview Elementary PTO will host the fourth annual
Spartan Dash on Saturday, April 25, rain or shine.
This is a fun and crazy fitness event that serves as
Lakeview PTO's largest fundraiser of the year.
Walk, skip or run through obstacles along the one-
mile trail at the Solon Nature and Recreation Area.
• Obstacles will be suitable for both children and
adults and are guaranteed to generate laughter.
• Entry forms and all money should be turned in to
Lakeview Elementary by April 6.
• Day-of-race registration will also be available start-
ing at 7:30 a.m., but T-shirts are not guaranteed.
• Concessions will be available for sale.
For more information, copies of the entry form, or
business sponsorship, go to Lakeview's Virtual Back-
pack on the Solon Community School District web-
site, or email Amber Sheeley at aesheeley@yahoo.
com.
Solon Spotlight Art for the Arts FUNraiser
On Saturday, April 11, local artist Lianne Westcot
will provide step-by-step guidance in her studio in
Swisher for the creation of a 16”x20” canvas called
Springtime Symphony. The public is encouraged to
participate in its creation.
There will be two sessions on Saturday, April 11, at
3:30 p.m. and at 7:30 p.m. No painting experience is
necessary.
Solon Spotlight will provide light snacks. Participants
may bring a favorite beverage (only non-alcoholic
beverages at the 3:30 p.m. seating).
Proceeds support the performing arts programs in
Solon schools. To sign up visit www.liannewestcot.
com/art-for-the-arts.html, or email Westcot at art@
liannewestcot.com, call 319-270-7341 or email Sheila
Barron at sbc1009@gmail.com.
Senior Awards Night
Senior Awards Night will be Wednesday, May 6, at 7
p.m. in the Middle School Auditorium.
Graduation
High School Graduation will be Sunday, May 17, at 2
p.m. in the High School Gym.
Upcoming dates
April 10– Hearing Tests
April 14– Girls Track Invitational
April 16– Boys Track Invitational
April 15 through 17– 8th Grade Washington D.C. trip
Hearing tests
All 5th grade students and new students to Solon
Middle School will have hearing tests on April 10.
Parents who do not want their child(ren) tested must
submit a notification in writing to the office or e-mail
Mary Ann Jedlicka at majedlicka@solon.k12.ia.us.
Empty
Bowls
Luncheon
Saturday,
April 11
11 AM- 1 PM
High School
Commons
Suggested
donation of
$10
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 13
FINE ARTS
LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY
Saturday, May 2, is the date for this
year’s prom. The theme for this year
is “The Last Waltz” and the dance
will have a rustic theme.
Tickets will go on sale Monday, April
27, during Seminar A. Ticket prices
will be $7 for singles and $12 for
couples. At the dance, prices will
double to $14 for singles and $24 for
couples.
Grand March begins at 5:30 p.m.
on Saturday in the high school
gymnasium. Pictures will be taken
in the media center until 6:30 p.m.
The dance will begin at 9 p.m. at
the Clarion Highlander Hotel and
Conference Center located at 2525
North Dodge St., Iowa City. The
dance will end promptly at mid-
night. Formal dress is required.
We hope to see you there!
April 6– 4th Grade Concert at 6:30 p.m.
in the Lakeview Big Gym
April 7– 2nd Grade Concert at 6:30 p.m.
in the Lakeview Big Gym
April 9– 1:30 p.m. Dismissal
April 9– Kindergarten Concert at 6:30 p.m.
in the Lakeview Big Gym
April 11– PTO Spring Bazaar from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
in the Lakeview Big Gym
April 15– Drop Everything and Read
at Lakeview, 4-7 p.m. in the Media Center
April 16– 1:30 p.m. Dismissal
April 23– 1:30 p.m. Dismissal
April 25– Spartan Dash from 8 a.m.-12 p.m.
at the Solon Parks and Recreation Nature Trail
April 30– 1:30 p.m. Dismissal
Lakeview Science Fair is back
Students are invited to participate in the 2015 Lakev-
iew Science Fair Saturday, April 18, at the Solon
Public Library from 1 until 3 p.m. (set-up starting at
12:30 p.m.). The Solon Public Library is co-sponsor-
ing the event.
If your student would like to participate, please email
erikabillerbeck@gmail.com, or sign up at the Solon
Public Library by April 1. If you know of any students
who may be interested, please encourage them to
participate. The library has limited space, so spots
will be reserved on a first-come, first-served basis.
Each student/group will get to present their project to
a judge. However, as this is a non-competitive even,
all students will receive recogni-
tion of participation.
Each student/group will get
half of a 6-foot table for
their display. No candles
or open flames of any
type are allowed in the
library. No caustic sub-
stances, explosives,
or other materials
which pose a hazard
are allowed. The room is
carpeted, so please keep
that in mind when planning your demonstration. The
students are responsible for leaving their areas clean
after the fair.
Please indicate in your email the names and grades
of the participants as well as any electrical outlet
needs. Participants must provide extension cords if
needed). If the student is a part of a group project,
please also list others included in the group.
Direct questions to erikabillerbeck@gmail.com.
SHS to present “12 Angry Jurors” April 17-19
The Solon Drama Department is proud to present “12 Angry Jurors” as its 2015 spring play. The show, re-
named from the 1957 film “12 Angry Men,” is an American classic that explores our justice system, prejudice
and the power of the individual. The show takes place over the course of one evening in the jury room as 12
jurors deliberate on their
verdict. Tempers flare and
each juror’s morality is
tested. Did the 19-year old
boy kill his father or is there
room for reasonable doubt?
The cast, directed by Ashley
Houk, includes Solon High
School students in grades
nine through 12.
The show will run April 17
through April 19 in the Solon
Middle School Auditorium.
The Friday and Saturday
performances will begin at 7
p.m. and the final show on
Sunday will begin at 2:30
p.m. Tickets will be $5 and
can be purchased at the
door before each perfor-
mance.
Jazz Ensembles are Champions
Congratulations to Solon High School’s “5th Street Jazz” and
“Blame It On Our Youth” on being selected to the Iowa Vocal Jazz
Championships. This is Blame It On Our Youth’s fourth appear-
ance at the championships and 5th Street’s eighth consecutive appearance. Solon is aiming for its fifth state
championship on April 7 at Morningside College in Sioux City.
SHS Anatomy and Physiology
community book discussion to be
held April 8
The Solon High School Anatomy
and Physiology class will facilitate
a discussion of the book, “The Hot
Zone: The Terrifying True Story of the
Origins of the Ebola Virus,” by Richard
Preston on Wednesday, April 8, from
4-5:30 p.m. in the Solon High School
media center.
Copies of the book are available at the
Solon Public Library.
Participation of community members
makes for a great educational op-
portunity for students. Be a part of a
unique learning experience.
Contact Kathy Kaldenberg via email at
kkaldenberg@solon.k12.ia.us for more
information.
Time for DEAR April 15
Solon CSD Media Services and the Lakeview PTO
will be sponsoring the annual Drop Everything And
Read (DEAR) event in honor of Beverly Cleary’s
birthday and the Lakeview
PTO’s Win With Reading April
celebration. Students, parents,
relatives, friends, neighbors and
readers of all kinds are invited
to join in at the Lakeview Media
Center to drop everything and
read. No prizes, no music, no
videos, just reading (and some snacks if you want to
bring them). The reading event will be held April 15,
from 4 until 7 p.m.
r, as this is a non-competitive even,
eceive recogni-
on.
up will get
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candles
f any
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s
zard
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THE LAST WALTZ

Junior/Senior Prom 2015
Saturday
May 2
Look who’s news!
Ronald McDonald plays a “Find the Bully” shell game
with Mrs. Kappmeyer and Connor Capper during his ap-
pearance for assemblies at Lakeview Elementary March
5. The popular character tours the country providing a
variety of shows for children, and the one delivered at
Lakeview focused on an anti-bullying message.
14 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
SOLON CITY HALL
101 N. Iowa St.
Telephone: 624-3755
Fax: 624-2122
CITY OFFICE HOURS:
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: 8 a.m.-12 p.m., 1-4 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.-12 p.m., 1-5 p.m.
newsletter
CITY UPDATE
By Cami Rasmussen,
City Administrator
Gardeners, take note!
As you thin out your perennial beds this
spring, consider donating any unwanted
plants to the library. We are switching the
five circle beds in front of the library from
annuals to perennials, so we are seeking
plants, especially those listed below.
Please place any plant donations on the
east side of the library by May 1. There
will be bins/boxes in which you can place
the plants. Please label them with name
and color, if possible. The Landscaping
Committee thanks you for your help in
beautifying the Library grounds.
Plants being sought include: Creeping
Phlox, Ajuga, Sweet William, Blanket
Flower/Gaillardia, Campanula/Bellflower,
Coneflowers, Coralbelles, Coreopsis,
Cranesbill/Geranium, Liatrus/Blazing
Star, Penstemon, Pinks/Dianthus,
Rubekia, Salvia, Shasta Daisy, Spider-
wort, Wild Bergamot/Monarda, Yarrow,
Asters (especially Purple Dome), Black-
eyed Susan, Autumn Joy Sedum, Silver
Mound and Stonecrop Sedum.
DASH for the Stash
The annual Money Smart Week program
this year is a scavenger hunt of sorts.
Find the four posters near the public
computers. Either scan the QR codes on
each poster or go to the website listed
on each poster to find the questions.
Leave your answers to the questions and
you will be entered in a drawing with a
chance to win $1,000 to open or add to
an Individual Retirement Account (IRA).
DASH for the Stash is sponsored by the
Investor Protection Trust and provides
patrons with an opportunity to learn
about investment fraud, investment fees,
what you need to know about financial
advisors and tips on building a nest egg.
This contest will start in the beginning of
April. The winner will be chosen from the
entries that answered the most questions
correctly and will be announced the last
week of April.
Spring cleaning and the
city-wide garage sale
This year, the dates for the city-wide
garage sale will be Friday, June 5, and
Saturday June 6. Registration forms are
now available on the library website and
in the library. If you don’t have enough
items for a sale of your own, think about
donating your items to the library for its
sale. The library cannot accept clothing,
encyclopedias, LPs, cassette tapes,
VHS tapes, old VCRS, old television sets,
or old computers. Please appropriately
recycle those items. We will accept items
for the garage sale anytime– no need to
wait.
SOLON PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
Solon Library Foundation
raffle winners
The Solon Library Foundation would like
to express a special thank you to Sam’s
Main Street Market, Kava House & Café,
New Pioneer Co-op, Lucy’s Cakes, Frida
Kahlo, Dairy Queen, Longou’s Red Vespa,
Harvest Oil & Vinegar, ZaZa’s Pasta,
Solon Economist, Coral Ridge Carousel
and Ice Arena, Scheels, Colonial Bowling
Lanes, Air FX Trampoline Park, Planet X,
Riverside Casino and Angie Longou with
Iowa Realty for their support of this year’s
raffle. The winners were:
Kalahari Gift Card: Brad Kotar
Hometown Dessert Basket: Melissa
Anderson
Date Night Basket: Lori Mckinnie
Adventures in Cooking: Jen Ferguson
Family Weekend Basket: Patty Benzing
Sports Basket: Scott Shulista
Read & Getaway Basket: Sandy Cline
Candy Land Basket: James Buck
Meal and a Movie
Meal and a Movie will be on Friday, April
24, from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. The movie is
free, but registration is required for the
catered meal and costs $7.50 for an
entrée, vegetable, and dessert. The
movie follows the meal and usually begins
around noon. Call Sandra Hanson at 624-
2710 to register, or sign up at Old Gold
Dining.
Anime Club
Do you like to read the Japanese Manga
books? Do you enjoy watching Anime
films and television shows? Would you like
to get together with others who read or
draw in Japanese animation style? If so,
you should join the Anime Club! Meetings
will be held every fourth Monday of each
month. This month’s meeting will be April
27, from 3:30-4:45 p.m. For fifth grade
and up. If you have any questions contact
the library at 319-624-2678.
Donations
If you are doing some early spring
cleaning this year and come across extra
pens, used padded mailing envelopes
(for packages), and/or LEGOs (bases and
animals) please consider donating them
to the library. We are always accepting
donations and the support we receive
from the community allows us to offer
more programs and activities.
Dates to remember
Storytime: Every Tuesday morning at
10:30 a.m. for children ages 2 through
5. Join us for stories, songs, and a craft.
Early-Out April 2: BINGO. This program
will run from 1:45 to 2:45 p.m.
Early-Out April 9: Movie. “Big Hero 6”
rated PG 102 min. This program will run
from 1:45 to 3:15 p.m.
Early-Out April 16: Craft: Miniature
totem poles. This program will run from
1:45 to 2:45 p.m.
Early-Out April 23: LEGOs. This pro-
gram will run from 1:45 to 2:45 p.m.
Scrabble Night: April 29 in the library
meeting room. Bring your own snacks
and Scrabble board. 6:30-8:30 p.m.
We’re ready for a game … or two!
Anime Club April 27: Meetings will be
held every fourth Monday of each month,
3:30-4:45 p.m. For fifth grade and up.
CITY HALL
The Solon City Hall is located at 101
N. Iowa St. City Hall hours are Monday,
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. and Wednesday 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Water bill drop boxes are located in
Sam’s Main Street Market and a drive-
through drop box is located next to
the ATM in the Bridge Community Bank
drive-through. Pay your water bill with
auto withdrawal. For more information,
contact city hall at 624-3755. For general
information please visit the city’s website
at www.solon-iowa.com.
BRUSH COLLECTION
Brush collection begins in April. Brush
is collected the FIRST MONDAY of each
month, April through November. Neatly
place brush parallel to the curb by 7:30
a.m. No brush shall be larger than 8 inch-
es in diameter and no longer than 15 feet
in length. Brush pickup shall consist of
twigs and branches only. The city will not
collect grass clippings, stumps, garden
waste, rocks, sod, leaves, bushes and
dimensional lumber.
Johnson County Refuse will pick up all
types of yard waste provided they have
a yard waste sticker on the bag. Items
include leaves, sod, grass clippings,
bushes and garden waste. Stickers can
be purchased at the Solon City Hall, 101
N Iowa St. Each sticker costs $1.25 and
is good for one bag up to a 39-gallon
capacity with a 40-pound weight limit.
They will be picked up with garbage on
Fridays.
The City also has a compost site avail-
able behind the new Public Works Building
located at 1031 Stinocher St. City resi-
dents are allowed to drop off landscape
waste only. For further information you
may also contact the city hall at 624-
3755.
BURN REGULATIONS
The City of Solon has specific burn days/
times for yard waste. Residents can burn
between the dates of April 1 through
May 25, and Oct. 1 through Nov. 25, on
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from
7 a.m. through 7 p.m. As has always
been the case, no burning of garbage or
construction material is allowed. Recre-
ational fires are permitted.
GOLF CART PERMITS
Golf Cart Permits are now available at
city hall for the 2015 season. Licensed
carts are permitted on authorized streets
between April 1 and Oct. 31. The cost for
a permit is $25 and you must provide a
valid drivers license and proof of insur-
ance. Permits must be renewed annually.
Contact city hall at 624-3755 for addi-
tional information. Must be 18 years old
and have a valid drivers license to drive
a golf cart on city streets. Gators and
four-wheelers are not allowed.
PET LICENSES
The 2015 pet licenses are now available
at city hall. Cats and dogs must get a
city license every year. Please bring in
a current rabies vaccination certificate
when you come in to license your pet.
Licensing your pet will allow city staff
to return your pet to your home if found
running at large.
“Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part I”
“The Tale of the Princess Kaguya”
“Predestination”
“Kill the Messenger”
“Annie” (2014)
“John Wick”
“Transformers: Age of Extinction”
“Foxcatcher”
“Outlander: Season 1, volume 1”
“Open Season: The story of seeds”
“Dear White People”
“This American Life: Season one”
“The Good Lie”
“Big Hero 6”
FILM CLIPS
Session 2 of Zumba is currently un-
derway. It started March 24 and meets
Tuesday and Thursday nights from 6:30-
7:15 p.m. at the Solon United Methodist
Church Family Life Center gymnasium.
It runs until April 23. Cost of a 10-punch
card: $50 for city residents or $60 for
non-city residents. Walk-ins are welcome
for a $10 fee or an unused punch from a
previously purchased punch card. Regis-
tration forms are available on the Parks
and Recreation website or can be picked
up from city hall or at the class.
Boot Camp Class is currently underway.
It includes a variety of exercises, includ-
ing resistance training and body weight
exercises. It started March 28 and meets
Tuesdays from 5:30-6:15 p.m. and some
Saturdays at 9 a.m. in the Skilled Physi-
cal Therapy room behind the Solon Care
Center. It will last for 10 classes. Cost of
a punch card is $50 for city residents or
$60 for non-city residents. Unused punch-
es from previously purchased punch
cards can be used or you can walk-in for
a $10 fee. Participants should bring two
sets of dumbbells (lighter and heavier)
water bottle, towel and a mat. Regis-
tration forms are available at the Solon
Parks and Recreation website or can be
picked up at city hall or at the class.
Rookie (coach pitch for 7-8 year
olds) Baseball and Softball registra-
tion has started and will continue until
April 24. All first and second grade Solon
students should have received a regis-
tration form in their Friday, March 27,
packet. Registration can be completed
online at https://solon-iowa.cogran.com/,
on the Solon Parks and Rec website, or
can be picked up at city hall. Practices
are scheduled to start the week of April
27 with games starting the week of May
18.
Rookie Baseball and Softball Coach-
es Meeting will be held on Wednesday,
April 22, at 6:30 p.m. at the Solon City
Hall.
T-ball registration will begin April 3
and last until May 1. All pre-K and kinder-
garten Solon students should receive a
registration form in their Friday, April 3,
packet. Starting April 3, registration can
be completed online at https://solon-io-
wa.cogran.com/ on the Solon Parks and
Recreation website, or can be picked
up at city hall. Practices are scheduled
to start the week of May 4 with games
scheduled to start May 22.
T-ball Coaches Meeting is scheduled
for Wednesday, April 29, at 6:30 p.m. at
the Solon City Hall.
SOLON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT
COMPACTED SOILS? LOUSY LAWN?
Solon will help host a soil quality restoration demonstration from 12 to 2 p.m. Sunday,
April 26, at the Timber DOME Lodge at the Solon Recreation and Nature Area. Learn a
quick, easy and cost-effective way to improve the overall health of a yard, transform-
ing dry, stressed lawns to lush and green.
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 15
We Accept Delta Dental, Wellmark Blue Dental, Aetna, Cigna and MetLife.
MC/Visa/Discover/Care Credit Accepted
Accepting New Patients
Family Friendly Caring Dentistry
Open Wednesday and Friday 8:00am-5:00pm
Medin
Family Dental
Corner of Hwy 1 and 5th Street in Solon
Call today for an appointment 624.3495
Digital X-Ray • Intra-Oral Camera • Root Canals
DENTURES-BRIDGES-CROWNS
Extractions • General & Cosmetic Dentistry
Children • Gum Disease • Bleaching • Zoom Whitening
www.medindental.com
We love to help you
Smile
Kristine Medin, DDS
Dr. Medin is a U of I Graduate
with 20 years of experience
MEN • WOMEN • CHILDREN
No appointment needed,
walk-ins welcome!
128 E. MAIN ST. • 624-7224
T/TH/F 9-5:30 • Wed 9-7 • Sat - 8-12
SOLON
BARBER
SHOP
www.solonbarbershop.webs.com
SOLON SENIOR ADVOCATES
April 2015 News
PROPOSED SENIOR
ADVOCATE TRIPS
All trips leave from Solon Recreation
and Nature Area. *Bus trips
*Thursday, April 16: Mennonite
Meal, Stringtown, Country Store.
*Wednesday, May 27: Circa 21 “The
Sound of Music.”
Thursday, June 18: Paddle Boat/
Grist Mill, Muscatine.
Thursday, July 16: Maharishi Uni-
versity, Fairfield.
Call 624-2710 or 430-8655 or sign-
up at Old Gold Dining.
Notice: If you have signed up for a
trip please let us know two weeks in
advance if you must cancel as we need
to reserve a bus and often purchases
tickets ahead of time.
MENU
The Old Gold Dining menu will no
longer appear on the Senior Advocate
newsletter.
THANKS
Thanks to Jim Martinek for sponsor-
ing the March Old Gold Dining Meal and
bringing us up to date with many of the
legal aspects of dealing with the issues
we face as we get older and need to
remain wiser. Jim fielded many ques-
tions which touched on a wide variety
of topics that were of concern to those
gathered.
The next sponsored meal will be
Wednesday, April 8, with Mark Haight,
Iowa Valley Monument.
MINI-BUS
The Advocates have started a movie
outing at Coral Ridge Mall or Sycamore
Mall on $5/free popcorn Tuesdays
once a month (depending on the movie
selection). We leave from the Solon
Recreation and Nature Area at 11 a.m.
to catch lunch at the mall. Movie start
times are staggered between 1-1:45
p.m. but most let out around 3:30 p.m.
Trip cost is $5. Please call 624-2710.
SINGLES HOUSEHOLD
SUPPORT GROUP
The Solon Public Library and the
Senior Advocates held their second
Singles Household Support Group
Wednesday, March 18. Larry Meister ex-
plained the importance of the booklet
he has devised to record all the things
your family should know if you are
incapacitated or passed away. Personal
finances, household issues, social-
ization, nutrition, mobility are other
important areas. The next meeting will
be Wednesday, April 15, at the Solon
Public Library at 9 a.m. Anyone dealing
with a household on their own may
attend– plan to join us!
SHARING THE MINI-BUS
The Advocates also wish to extend
an invitation to groups, individuals and
organizations, not necessarily seniors,
to request the use of the mini-bus for
area day trips. The Senior Advocates
will coordinate with the requesting
party the organizing and scheduling
of each trip and will provide volunteer
drivers. For more information please
call 319-855-9797 or 319-624-2710.
MEAL & MOVIE
A new wrinkle on the Meal & Movie
agenda; a drawing for a $10 gift certifi-
cate to a local eatery will be conducted
each month. Space allowance is 20
people so be sure and sign up early
at Old Gold Dining or call 624-2710.
Bring containers for leftovers! The next
Meal & Movie will be Friday, April 24,
featuring “Young Victoria,” a peek into
the early days of the Queen. Academy
Award Winner 2009 for Best Costume
Design.
RIDES
Colleen Powers has offered to ferry
seniors to appointments and errands.
Please call 631-3940 to check on avail-
ability and to schedule an appointment.
CANS AND BOTTLES
A good way to help Senior Advocates
with bus expenses is to take your cans
and bottles to Bev Noskas’s garage at
221 N. Iowa St. in Solon. Please help Bev
by bringing only cans clean of “extras!”
CHORES
Dave Frisbie is taking calls to help
with your household chores. Give him a
ring at 624-6024.
HOUSE CLEANING
Jennifer Lane, 389-0665; $15/hr.
CONTACT THE SENIOR
ADVOCATES:
Art Tellin: 624-2824 or 855-9797
Don Burch: 624-4054
Carol Tobias: 351-6707
Larry Meister: 624-2516
Clayton Patterson: 624-3859
Jeanne Erhart: 624-3686
Sandy Hanson: 624-2710 or 430-
8655
Barry Byrne: 319-354-8757
V E N D O R S / C R A F T E R S I N C L U D E :
Raffle tickets available for purchase for items donated by vendors.
Come join us for some shopping & fun and help support Lakeview PTO!!
Saturday, April 11
9 am–1 pm
Solon Lakeview Elementary School
Spring Bazaar
LAKEVIEW PTO
Enter off Racine Ave. on the SW side of the building by the playground.
• Gunny the Clown
• It Works
• Jamberry Nails
• Jeunesse
• Lilla Rose
• Longaberger
• Nerium
• Norwex
• Origami Owl
• Pampered Chef
• Partylite
• Perfectly Posh
• Pink Zebra
• Premier Designs
Jewelry
• Scentsy
• Tastefully Simple
• Thirty One
• Tupperware
• Wine Shop at Home
• Yoli
• Younique
• Young Living
Esst. Oils
ON THE FARM DIAGNOSTICS
X-RAY & ULTRASOUND
Helen Beck 319-640-0921
DOCTOR OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
www.facebook.com/equineandchiro Dr.Beck@equineandchiro.com
www.equineandchiro.com
Solon History Mystery
Rita Brannaman of the Solon American Legion Auxiliary is seeking help trying to find
out the fate of the stand-alone sign pictured to the south across Main Street in this
photo. Anyone with information regarding the sign can help solve this history mystery
by calling Brannaman at 624-2272. (contributed photo)
JOHNSON COUNTY– The City of Solon
and the City of North Liberty are joining
with the Johnson County Soil and Water
Conservation District (JCSWCD) to or-
ganize a soil quality restoration (SQR)
demonstration for each community.
The SQR demonstration in Solon will
be from 12 to 2 p.m. Sunday, April 26,
at the Timber DOME Lodge at the Solon
Recreation and Nature Area off of Racine
Avenue. The SQR demonstration in North
Liberty will be from 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday,
Soil quality restoration demonstrations in Solon and North Liberty April 26 and May 3
May 3, and will be held at Mike and Kelly
Joseph’s property at 1485 Red Oak Dr. in
North Liberty.
Solon and North Liberty are both lo-
cated in one of the fast growing areas in
the state. As buildings and houses are
built, valuable topsoil is removed and
the remaining subsoil is compacted by
heavy equipment and construction activ-
ity. Compacted soils do not allow storm
water to infiltrate, leaving the water un-
treated as it carries pollutants into nearby
streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands.
SQR combines deep-tine aeration and
spreading nutrient rich compost on a
lawn to increase a yard’s organic matter
content and its overall ability to absorb
rain water. This practice is a quick, easy
and cost-effective way to improve the
overall health of a yard, transforming dry,
stressed lawns to lush and green.
The public is invited to attend either
of the two demonstrations to learn more
about the benefits of SQR and talk with
staff from JCSWCD, the City of Solon and
Forever Green Landscaping and Garden
Center. Refreshments will be provided
and an RSVP is requested. To register
for these events, go to www.jcswcd.
org or call Breanna Zimmerman at the
Johnson County Soil and Water Conser-
vation District office, 319-337-2322 x3.
Individuals needing accommodations
or who have questions about the event
should contact Breanna Zimmerman at
the number above.
Do you have a news
item to submit for
NoJoCo?
Submissions should be made
by the 22nd of each month
to make the deadline for the
next issue.
Contact: Doug Lindner
hybrid@southslope.net
319-624-2233
319-624-1356 (fax)
www.soloneconomist.com
www.northlibertyleader.com
16 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
Open Monday thru Saturday
10:30am-2am • Sunday 12-8
1650 Dows Street, Ely 319.848.3292
Monday Lasagna with garlic toast
Tuesday Country fried steak, fried potatoes
sausage gravy and texas toast
Wednesday Stufed burger with fries
Thursday Meatloaf, garlic mashed potatoes,
beef gravy and texas toast
Friday 10oz true Canadian walleye, fries,
coleslaw and texas toast $13.99
Saturday All you can eat BROASTED
chicken Includes fries & cole slaw
Lunch Specials 11am-2pm
All lunch specials are $7.99 unless noted
Nightly Dinner Specials 5pm-10pm
Monday ALL YOU CAN EAT jumbo wings with 10 diferent
sauces to choose from $8.99
Tuesday Single One topping pizza $7.99
Wednesday $1 hard or soft shell beef or chicken tacos. 99¢ kids meal,
includes drink and ice cream with purchase of adult meal.
Thursday ALL YOU CAN EAT jumbo shrimp coleslaw and fries $10.99,
8pm-Midnight: Open jukebox, free pool.
Friday 10 oz True Canadian Walleye, wild rice, coleslaw, texas toast $13.99
Saturday ALL YOU CAN EAT broasted chicken, coleslaw, fries $6.99
$2 Domestic Pints
$3 Specialty Pints
$3 Tall Boys
$2.25 Domestic Bottles
$2.25 Well Drinks
Happy Hour
Monday thru Friday
from 3-6
NEW!!! Every Sunday
1/2 price Appetizers (select items)
$5 Cheese Burger & Fries
11am to 10pm.
N
E
W
!
Bloody Mary Bar every Sunday!
Drivers Ed Classes
MOUNT VERNON DRIVERS EDUCATION LLC
319-361-9405 www. mvdri versed. com
Now offering MOPED CLASSES see website for details
SOLON
Classes at
St. Marys
Catholic
Church
IOWA CITY
Classes at
Christ the
King Lutheran
Church
Upcoming Sessions:
• May 4-21
• June 22-July 3
• August 10-21
Upcoming Sessions:
• April 6-23
• May 26-June 5
• June 29-July 10
ELY
Classes now Available!
Upcoming Sessions:
• June 8-19
• July 6-17
Classes held
at the Ely
Community Center
April activities for Old Gold Diner
Starting April 1, to receive a monthly menu, stop
by and pick it up, or call 624-2251 to have it mailed
to you. It will no longer be distributed inside the
Solon Economist. The weekly menu will remain printed
in the Solon Economist.
• Bingo every Tuesday and Thursday
• Cards every Friday
• New special Dessert Day April 7 (and following
first Tuesday of each month) There will be a special
homemade dessert offered along with the regular
menu.
• Sponsored Meal April 8, Iowa Monument.
• Foot Clinic April 9
• Musical Entertainment by Johnny Krob April 15,
with the celebration of The Old Gold Diner’s 35th
Anniversary.
• Old Gold Diner Site Council meets April 28 at
1:30 p.m.
Reservations must be made the day before by 1
p.m. (for Monday call by 1 p.m. the Friday before)
All ages are welcome; children must be accompa-
nied by an adult.
The cost is $3.25 per person no matter their age.
OLD GOLD DINER
Monday, April 6: Italian roast
chicken breast, rigatoni Florentine,
tossed salad, garlic bread and
cherry Kuchen bars.
Tuesday, April 7: Mediterra-
nean pork loin, long grain wild
rice, Greek chop salad and fluffy
lemon dessert. Special dessert
day. Bingo.
Wednesday, April 8: Swill
steak with tomato, parsley
noodles, cabbage with dill and
breadbasket. Sponsored meal
Iowa.
Thursday, April 9: Chicken En-
chilada casserole, corn, spinach
salad, mini cinnamon/sugar stick
and ice cream sundae. Foot clinic/
Bingo.
Friday, April 10: Salmon cro-
quette, creamed potatoes, lemon
broccoli, pineapple and cottage
cheese and carrot cake oat bars.
Cards.
Monday, April 13: Sweet garlic
chicken breasts, garden blend
vegetable, sugar snap peas and
summer fruit crisp.
Tuesday, April 14: Homemade
lasagna, sweet Italian green
beans, garlic bread and cookies
and ice cream. Bingo.
Wednesday, April 15: Old Gold
Diner 35th Anniversary – Surprise
menu. Johnny Krob.
Thursday, April 16: Seasoned
pork loin, baked sweet potatoes,
Scandinavian vegetables and
strawberry shortcake. Bingo.
Friday, April 17: Salisbury
steak, mini baker potatoes, savory
carrots and chilled pineapple/
oranges. Cards.
Monday, April 20: Hushpuppy
fish fillet, hash brown casserole,
green beans and peach cobbler
with whip topping.
Tuesday, April 21: Sage
stuffed chicken, long grain wild
rice, Scandinavian vegetables and
berry layer dessert. Bingo.
Wednesday, April 22: Pork
tenderloin sandwich, potato salad,
baked beans, and sherbet. 4th
graders.
Thursday, April 23: Roast beef,
mashed potatoes, spinach salad
with bacon and frosted cake.
Bingo.
Friday, April 24: Baked Enchi-
lada, corn, mini cinnamon/sugar
stick and fresh fruit. Cards.
Monday, April 27: Savory pork
chop, parsley potato, broccoli and
lemonade dessert.
Tuesday, April 28: Roast
turkey, ginger rice, carrots and
chocolate chip bar. Bingo. 1:30
p.m. Old Gold Dining Site Council.
Wednesday, April 29: Citrus
salsa chicken, baked potato,
asparagus and frosted cupcake.
Thursday, April 30: Traditional
meatloaf, scalloped potatoes,
country trio vegetables and cherry
gelatin dessert. Bingo.
Old Gold Diner April Menu
Open at 11:00am 7 Days a Week
106 E. Main St. • Solon • 624-7000
DINE IN
CARRY OUT
DELIVERY
D & D Pizza is
8 Years Old!
ANY LARGE 14”
1 TOPPING PIZZA
Good thru April 30, 2015, limit two pizzas, mention this ad.
$
8.00EACH
Shop MountVernon
224 1st St. SW
Mount Vernon
• Bean Pod Candles • Wood Wicks
• Home & Garden Accessories
• Willow Tree
• Custom Framing • Walnut Ridge
105 1st St. W. • Mt. Vernon • 895-6372
Te Right
Frame of
Mind
First Brick
Antiques
319-895-0319
ThePerfect Blend
Gift Shop
319-895-6862
One Stop Shopping
be Friday, April 10, from 6 to 8 p.m. at 1924 Hwy. 1
NE, Solon.
All proceeds from the race will be donated.
“This event has been a way for our family to raise
money to help another family in need but it is pri-
marily a way for our family to honor Brett’s memory,”
Drea said. “Brett was a true testament to the strength
of the human spirit.”
This year’s proceeds will be donated to Solon resi-
dent Mark Kasparek.
Mark is a Solon resident who was diagnosed with
diabetes at the age of 16. Approximately eight years
ago, he received kidney and pancreas transplants.
The transplanted kidneys have since failed, requiring
regular dialysis treatments.
Five weeks ago, Drea said, Kasparek underwent a
lengthy surgery to repair a heart valve and to perform
a triple bypass, but during the heart valve surgery it
was discovered his veins were too brittle to proceed
with the bypass.
Kasparek is also having issues with his lungs as
one is collapsed and needs to be inflated and the oth-
er needs to be drained regularly (approximately every
two weeks). Drea said Kasparek hopes to be put back
on the transplant list.
For more information about Mark and his needs,
please contact his brother Mike Kasparek at hawk-
kush@yahoo.com.
“We just feel like it’s important for people to re-
member Brett and remember how much fun he was,
and that his life was not defined by the leukemia,”
Drea explained. “And maybe some people who didn’t
know him will learn about him. And hopefully it will
help raise awareness. I think people are afraid to talk
about cancer. You don’t know what to say.”
Brett’s former classmate Kearce Lindner agreed.
Brett was always very open about his treatment
and very open about his struggles, Lindner said. “I
think cancer is something that people are afraid to
talk about because it can be sad and tragic and devas-
tating,” she said. “But Brett showed us how it can also
be brave and heroic and inspirational.”
Lindner said Brett continues to motivate those who
knew him.
“We often find ourselves talking about him, espe-
cially about the times we had on the farm. It’s special
because he was special,” she said. “This fundraiser is
another opportunity to celebrate Brett’s memory with
all of the people he inspired.
“He’s my daily reminder to do better, to try harder,
to live day-to-day,” Lindner continued. “He’s in our
hearts every single day. The memorial run is a way to
honor that.”
Drea also indicated that Brett maintained a positive
attitude in his battle against the disease.
“He was a fighter. He said until the day he died,
‘I’m going to fight this. I’m going to fight it,’” she said.
“He was just truly, at least to me, an inspiration. I
really admired his strength and his spirit.”
The organizers are also seeking sponsors to help
offset the costs of the timed event.
“There are outgoing costs that are incurred, such
as the T-shirt costs and the chip timing, which will
have to come out of the entry fees if not enough race
sponsors are found,” Drea explained.
For a minimum donation of $50, race sponsor
names will appear on the volunteer shirts. For dona-
tions over $100, race sponsor names will appear on
the race T-shirts. To become a race sponsor, or for
more information about the Brett Smith Memorial
Run/Walk, contact Drea at dbsadrea@hotmail.com or
319-330-7854.
Brett Smith Memorial: Continued from page 10
Solon FC announces partnership,
summer camps with Chicago Fire
SOLON– Solon FC has proudly announced partner-
ship with Major League Soccer’s Chicago Fire. Solon
FC will host a summer soccer camp experience, like
no other in the area, from July 13-17 in Solon.
Campers, ages 6 to16, can choose to participate
in a half-day camp, held either 9 a.m. to noon or 1-4
p.m., or a full-day camp held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Camp fees include five days of camp, a shirt, ball
and a ticket to a Chicago Fire game in Bridgeview, Ill.
Cost for the half-day camp is $120; the full-day camp
will cost $200. For the younger participants, ages 2-5,
a shortened, “Little Sparks” camp will be held from
5-6 p.m. for a cost of $65.
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 17
WE NEED YOU!
The Friends of EPL has a need for you! We are seeking
applications from interested parties who can serve in the
capacity as our Treasurer or to be a part of an energetic group
that makes a big difference in our community! Please consider
being a part of this important group and plan to attend our next
meeting on Wednesday, April 8, at 8 p.m. For more information,
please call Sarah at 848-7616.
STORY TIME
Toddler story times are Mondays at 10 a.m. Preschool story
times are held Thursdays at 10 a.m. and at 2 p.m. Our themes
for preschool story time are as follows:
April 2: Hoppy Easter!
April 9: Rain, Rain, Go Away
April 16: Love Your Library
April 23: Spring is in Full Swing
April 30: May Day Baskets
MEET MADELINE
A special story time– Join us on Wednesday, April 22, at 7
p.m. for a special story time and welcome Madeline Jarvis, our
new Youth Services Librarian! She has some special Earth Day
stories and activities planned – see you there!
FINE AMNESTY
The next fine amnesty days will be April 6-11. We will forgive your
fines if you bring in a non-perishable food item for each item that
has a fine. We will not accept any expired items. Even if you do
not have any fines, we will be happy to collect food donations
for the pantry. Please call the library with any questions. Thank
you for making sure your account is current, we appreciate it!
NATIONAL LIBRARY WEEK
April 12-18: Behind every great community is a great library, so
take the time to celebrate National Library Week and your library!
The library would like to thank everyone who has donated their
time, talents and/or monetary support. You make a difference
in the life of your library! We also would like to recognize the
contributions of the Library Board of Trustees and the Friends of
Ely Public Library. Your support makes our library an outstanding
part of our community – thank you! Tuesday is National Library
Workers Day – a time to thank librarians and the rest of the
library - so stop down and see us! Come all week long and enter
your name in for some wonderful prize drawings.
MASTER GARDENER SERIES
Mark your calendars now for the next series of FREE classes!
Classes are at 6:30 p.m. and topics will include:
Wed. April 8: Flowers Hummingbirds Love
Ely Public Library
www.ely.lib.ia.us
(319) 848-7616
1595 Dows Street, Ely
EVENTS CALENDAR
Ely Expression
CITY OFFICE HOURS: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
1570 Rowley Street, P.O. Box 248 Ely, Iowa 52227
848-4103
After Hours Emergency Only: 848-7603
Tue. April 14: Ring My Bells for Coral Bell!
Tue. April 21: Pretty Poisons Lurking in your Garden
Tue. April 28: Container Gardens.
MONUMENTS MEN
Mark your calendars for May 21 at 6:30 p.m. as Nancy Trask
presents on Iowa’s Monuments Men. A special display will be
available for viewing at the library meeting room as well. This
presentation is sponsored by the Ely Legion and EPL. Hope to
see you there!
LIBRARY SPACE PLANNING GRANT
We were awarded a grant from the State Library to work with
George Lawson, a Library Consultant, for library space planning.
This planning is essential to make sure that EPL will be able to
meet the current and future needs of our growing community!
The report is completed and is available to read at the library
or you can find a link to it on our website. Feel free to stop in
and chat with Sarah about this exciting opportunity!
EARTH DAY PROGRAM
Stop by the library on Saturday, April 25, at 9 a.m. for a special
Earth Day program. We will be walking along the bike trail and
State Street picking up garbage and helping keep our piece
of Earth healthy. Supplies and refreshments will be provided.
For more information, please call the library at 848-7616.
Thank you!
KNITTING & CROCHET CLASSES
We continue to offer beginning knitting class and beginning
crochet class on Saturdays, April 11 and 25 at 12:30 p.m. All
levels of experience (or no experience) are welcome to attend!
Stop by and socialize while working on your latest project!
ELY CITY WIDE GARAGE SALE DAY
The city wide garage sale day will be from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. on
Saturday, May 2. Rain or shine, come early for the best deals!
If you would like to hold a sale, please stop by the library or
city hall to pick up a registration form. You can also download
it from the library website. Registration deadline is April 28.
Beginning April 30, maps will be available at the library and from
our website. The map shows the various sale sites in town and
some highlights of what each has to offer. The registration fee
of $5 per sale location will help pay the publicity costs. Please
join us in this community effort!
CINNAMON ROLLS
It can be a long day looking for garage sale deals, so start your
Saturday morning out right with a fresh baked cinnamon roll! The
Friends group will be selling cinnamon rolls, juice and coffee to
raise money for continued support of the library.
ELY PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE
The annual book sale will be held Saturday, May 2, beginning at
8 a.m. at the library meeting room. We will have an early bird
sale from 5-7 p.m. on Friday night (May 1) for Friends members
and anyone who has a registered garage sale. There are a
variety of books available at a great price. The library would
appreciate donations of gently used books for the book sale.
However, we cannot accept encyclopedia sets, textbooks or
VCR tapes. Please bring your donations to the library. Receipts
for tax purposes are available if you wish.
FREE YOGA AND TAI CHI CLASSES OFFERED
Paula Bradway continues her morning yoga stretch on
Thursdays at 8 a.m. Paula has several years’ experience with
yoga and has much to share. Please wear comfortable clothing
and bring a towel or yoga mat. Thomas Moore has 30 years’
experience with Tai Chi and looks forward to meeting you. His
class will be offered Tuesdays at 8 a.m. Space is limited for all
of these classes, so register by calling 848-7616.
COUCH TO 5K TRAINING & RUNNING CLUB
Are you interested in training for a 5K or do you need a
running buddy? Back by request, EPL sponsors a Couch to 5K
training program and Running Club. This is an opportunity for
beginning runners or walkers to train for a 5K in 10 weeks, while
experienced runners can join the fun and run at their own pace.
We will meet in the evenings at Ely City Park starting April 13
at 6:30 p.m. A waiver form will need to be completed for each
participant. As with any exercise, you should seek your doctor’s
approval before beginning. Register by calling 848-7616.
CORRIDOR METROPOLITAN PLANNING
will be having a special display and FREE informational session
at the library on Wednesday, April 8, from 4-6 p.m.
NATIONAL POETRY MONTH
Do you think LEGOs are just for kids? Not sure how to celebrate
National Poetry Month? We can help! Stop down and express
yourself and play through our poetry building blocks! Entries
will be photographed and showcased on our Facebook page.
Stop in and be creative!
BABYGARTEN CLASSES
Join us for Babygarten, a fun, exciting, and informational
program for infants (birth to 24 months) and their caregivers.
Classes last about an hour and include a free play period for
both babies and caregivers. Mark your calendar for our 4-week
session beginning April 3 at 9 a.m. Register for this FREE class
online at www.ely.lib.ia.us or call 848-7616!
TRAVELING TALES
We are excited to be offering our story time in a to-go format,
available for day care providers and preschools for FREE at
their location! Please contact Sarah Sellon at 848-7616 with
questions.
SEED LENDING LIBRARY
The Ely Seed Lending Library has many seeds ready for you
to check out! We have another great growing season of events
planned! Contact elyseedlibrary@gmail.com for more info.
Judy Wery Joins the City Council
The City Council appointed Judy Wery to the Ely
City Council on March 9, 2015. Ms Wery joins
the City Council to fill a mid-term vacancy that
resulted when Dave Rasmussen resigned from
the Council. Judy will serve on the City Council
until after the Nov. 5, 2015. Please thank Judy
for her dedication to Ely, and willingness to serve
our community.
Hoover Nature Trail Will be Extended
to Ely Community Center in 2015
Ely will extend the Hoover Nature Trail southward
from Ely City Park to the Ely Community Center,
1570 Rowley Street, in 2015. Ely received a
$199,700 grant from the Iowa Department of
Transportation to help pay the cost of extending
the trail to the Community Center. Ely will use
Local Option Sales Tax money to provide the
City’s required local match and pay the balance
of the cost of the work. The Hoover Trail will run
on the former railroad right of way between Main
and Hillcrest Streets; then on the north side of
Dows St. to the east side of Main St. then to the
Community Center on the south side of Rowley
Street. Work is expected to start after July 4.
White Topping Ely Road
The Linn County Secondary Roads Department
is working on plans to resurface Ely Road with a
concrete overlay. They currently plan to perform
related ditch and culvert work in 2015, and place
the new “white top” surface during summer of
2016. Linn County plans to “White Top” Ely Road
(or State Street in Ely) from 76th Avenue to Ely’s
north city limits (roughly Harger’s Acoustics), and
from our south city limit to Seven Sisters Road.
Linn County will add a roughly 8-inch thick layer of
concrete on top of the existing roadway. Contact
Linn County Secondary Roads at 319-892-6400
for more information.
Renew Your Ely Golf Cart & ATV Permit
It is time to renew your Ely Golf Cart/ATV permit;
if you haven’t already. Your annual golf cart/ATV
permit was supposed to be renewed by April
1, so it is essential that you renew it as soon
as possible. The registration fee is $25 per
year; and the City Clerk/Administrator has to
inspect the vehicle before issuing or renewing a
registration. Stop by City Hall Monday-Friday from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to renew your permit.
Breakfast at the Ely American Legion
Start your Sunday on April 12 with an absolutely
awesome breakfast! The Annual Legion Breakfast
is Sunday, April 12, from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. at
the Legion Hall, 1545 Main St. in Ely. The cost
is $8 for adults, $4 for children under the age of
12 and kids 5 and under will be admitted free.
Tickets are available from Legion members prior
to the breakfast and will also be available at the
door. On the menu: pancakes, fried potatoes with
or without onion and caraway, scrambled eggs,
sausage, ham, biscuits & gravy, milk, juice and
coffee. Mark your calendar now and come enjoy.
Save the Dates for Fall Fest!
Fall Fest 2015 is set for the evening of Friday,
Oct. 2, and all day Saturday, Oct. 3. Fall Fest
2015 will start Friday evening with the Fall
Fest 5K and 1-mile events; with traditional Fall
Fest favorites along with great new activities
throughout the day on Saturday, Oct. 3. Ely’s
Parks & Recreation Commission is looking for
volunteers to help out. Please contact the P&R
Crew at 319-848-4103 or by email at elyparks@
gmail.com if you or your organization are willing
to offer your time and talents to help Fall Fest.
Interested groups can help out as a service
project or as a potential fundraiser for their
organization. Visit us on the web at www.elyiowa.
com for the newest Fall Fest info.
Ely Winter Farmers Market
Stop by Ely’s Winter Farmers Market in the
library meeting room for a great variety of locally
produced food and goodies. The Winter Market
is from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 11, and
Saturday, April 25. The Outdoor Farmers Market
starts will be by the Community Center on Garage
Sale day, Saturday, May 2. Contact Ali Alldredge,
848-2036 or elyfarmersmarket@gmail.com if
you are interested in being a vendor for the winter
or summer markets.
Give Ely’s Parks Some TLC
We Need You to join a crew of community minded
Prairie Point Middle School volunteers and the Ely
Park & Rec gang in giving our city parks some
tender loving care during this year’s annual Parks
Clean-Up Day starting at 10 a.m. Friday, April 17.
Please contact City Hall at 848-4103 or Parks &
Recreation Commission via email at elyparks@
gmail.com to let us know you are helping out.
Join us at City Hall (1570 Rowley Street) starting
at 10 a.m. if you have some energy and a little
free time to get our parks ready for another
great year of fun!
4th Annual Plant and Landscape
Tack Swap is Saturday, April 25!
Plants of all types and sizes are welcome along
with other garden related items at the Swap,
Saturday, April 25, in front of Ely City Hall from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. We happily accept yard art,
mulch, tools, pots, planters, bird baths and lawn
furniture. The goal of the swap is for gardeners
to have fun gathering together, sharing plants,
exchanging ideas, and to help new gardeners
get started.
For anyone looking to swap their plants or to
get plants from other gardeners, bring your
plants or something to barter. Bring five and
swap five, bring two and swap two. The number
of items you bring can be swapped one-to-one.
Items remaining at the end of the swap will be
cultivated back in to Ely by being placed in the
parks and along the trail. If you are interested in
helping with this, let one of the volunteers know.
What a great way to start an Ely “Garden Club”!
Emergency Sirens & Severe Weather
Take shel ter i mmedi atel y when the Fi re/
Emergency siren sounds continuously for three
minutes! Ely’s Fire/Emergency sirens sound
for three continuous minutes when there is a
severe weather event like a tornado or severe
thunderstorm with dangerous winds in the area.
Go to shelter in a windowless room in your
basement or the lowest level of your house
immediately when the siren sounds for three
minutes. Take shelter in the innermost room of
the lowest level of your home if you do not have
a basement. After you are safely in shelter check
local radio, TV or other local media for more
information on the weather emergency.
Linn County Emergency Management Agency
(LCEMA), in partnership with our trained weather
spotters, will closely monitor the weather
conditions and activate the sirens from the Ely
Fire Department when dangerous high winds or
tornados become a threat to the area. During
radar indicated weather situations, LCEMA
directs our weather spotters to activate the
sirens when needed. An “All-Clear” siren will
sound for 1 continuous minute once the severe
weather event has passed.
The Ely Volunteer Fire Department tests the
sirens the last Monday of the month. During
the test you will hear one short buzz for sound,
followed by a voice warning that will cycle three
times - once for each siren in Ely.
Youth Soccer and Baseball Programs
by Ely Parks and Recreation
Ely area kids area are going to be busy with
terrific spring sports activities thanks to the hard
working Ely Parks & Rec. crew.
Kids’ Soccer– Games and practice are Mondays
from 6 to 6:45 p.m. April 6 through May 4, at
Community Center Park. There will be two weeks
of practice, and three weeks of games. We need
volunteers to enjoy a great opportunity to coach
and otherwise have fun teaching the tykes about
soccer and having fun with sports.
Youth T-Ball and Baseball – Games are Monday
through Thursday May 11 through July 1. Teams
play at Ely City Park (North end of Hillcrest Street)
and the College Community campus. Practice
starts April 13, team coaches will contact team
members about practice schedules.
More information, registration forms and
schedules online at www.elyiowa.com/Ely_
Recreation&Leagues.htm.
APRIL 6 – MAY 4
Kids soccer, Mondays 6:00-6:45 p.m.
Ely Community Center.
SUNDAY, APRIL 12
American Legion Breakfast
7:00 a.m. – noon.
SATURDAY, MAY 2
Citywide Garage Sale Day,
Friends of the Library Annual
Book Sale at Ely Library
18 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
Come work in this friendly atmosphere!
Chatham Oaks, Inc. is a residential and
community services provider in Iowa City
serving individuals with chronic mental illness.
FULL-TIME & PART-TIME
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CHATHAM OAKS
Pre-employment drug screen, criminal history
background check and driving record check are
required. Excellent beneft package.
Competitive wage. EOE.
Applications available at Chatham Oaks:
4515 Melrose Ave, Iowa City
or apply online at: www.abbe.org
Available Positions
COOK
Full-time, must be able to
work every 3rd weekend
DISHWASHERS
Part-time, includes evenings and weekends
RESIDENTIAL AIDES
Full -time, 1st & 2nd shift.
Part-time 2nd shift every other weekend
Locator
South Slope is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
RESPONSIBILITIES:
Accurately locate network faciliƟes and services uƟlizing electronic
locaƟng equipment; stand by when network faciliƟes are in excava-
Ɵon areas; expose network faciliƟes as necessary; light equipment
and vehicle maintenance; facility and property maintenance; central
offi ce (CO) maintenance (including, but not limited to cleaning floors,
changing rugs and air filters); other duƟes as required.
REQUIREMENTS:
• Permanent shiŌ Monday through Friday 8:00am – 4:30pm.
• Ability to work on-call hours if business needs require.
• TelecommunicaƟons-related experience.
• Good organizaƟon and communicaƟon skills.
• Ability to work both independently and in a team environment.
• Valid driver’s license with a clean driving record.
• Self-starter with the ability to prioriƟze workload.
• Customer oriented and driven to exceed customer expectaƟons.
• Must have respect for internal and external customers.
• Responsible and trustworthy.
• Ability to pracƟce and follow company safety rules and regulaƟons.
• Ability to work various hours, shiŌs, or overƟme as
business needs require.
• Ability to work in outside environment year-round.
If interested, please submit your resume and an applicaƟon
(found at www.southslope.com/careers) to jobs@southslope.com
CLASSIFIEDS
$13 for the first 20 words, 10¢
each additional word. Call
624-2233.
HELP WANTED
SET-UP AND DELIVERY:
Part-time position in busy
tractor store. Three days:
Thursday and Friday, 8AM-
6PM; and Saturday, 8AM-
3PM. Ideal for semi-retired.
City Tractor Co., North Liber-
ty. Ph. 319-665-6500.
TECHNICIAN FOR TRAC-
TORS AND MOWERS. Full-
time opening for professional
service. Work in-shop and
on-site field service. Full ben-
efits. Training. Tools required.
Smoke-free. Saturdays by ro-
tation. City Tractor Co., North
Liberty. Ph. 319-665-6500.
FBG SERVICE CORPO-
RATION is looking for full-
time and part-time cleaning
specialists for our Iowa City,
Coralville and North Liberty
locations. Hours are 2nd
shift, Monday-Friday. Pay
rate is $9.00/hr with a $250
sign on bonus after 90 days.
Applicants need to be detail
oriented and have reliable
transportation. Enjoy work-
ing for an employee owned
company that offers monthly
bonus and more; for full-
time employment 401k, paid
vacation, paid holidays and
medical!
Please print out an applica-
tion from our website, www.
fbgservices.com and mail
to: 238 1/2 Blairs Ferry Rd
NE, Cedar Rapids, IA 52402.
Must pass pre-employment
drug test and background
check.
SERVICES
MARY’S CLEANING. Hon-
est, dependable, insured.
Excellent references, over
20 years experience. 319-
359-8677.
FOR RENT
NORTH LIBERTY COM-
MERCIAL Office Space for
Lease: 655 Liberty Way (off
Penn Street).
2,400 Sq. Ft. • Ability to build
space to suit • Reception
area • Kitchenette • Bath-
rooms • Fiber internet con-
nection available • Storage.
$1,500/month, plus utilities •
Contact 319-665-5353.
CONSIGNMENT SALE
MIDWEST KIDS MARKET
Consignment Sale, April 9-11
at Johnson County Fair-
grounds. Shop thousands of
quality clean kids items plus
vendors and food. Free entry,
locally owned. www.midwest-
kidsmarket.com
FOR SALE
NEW MATTRESS SETS:
Twin, $99, Full $129, Queen
$149, King $249. Delivery
Available. Free Layaway.
Mattress Outlet, 319-531-
6363.
WANTED
JUNK APPLIANCES, includ-
ing air conditioners, furnaces,
steel and batteries. Will pick
up for free. 331-8122.
base and pictures from
iCLIPART for Schools. Fi-
nally, they mashed their
readings of the poems,
the music and the images
together in GarageBand
to create a multimedia
experience.
The recordings then
became available for all
students to experience.
Over half of what she
does, Kaldenberg said, is
posted on social media.
She regularly updates
her blog, Making Con-
nections, with links and
ideas she finds interest-
ing and uses Pinterest
as a portfolio of the
work she, teachers and
students have done. She
also uses Twitter to post
photos and updates on
what’s going on around
the district.
But technology is
really only one facet of
Kaldenberg’s job. She is,
after all, a librarian, so
books and literature are
at the center of every-
thing she does.
Early in her tenure,
she heard about the
event Drop Everything
and Read (D.E.A.R.), a day
when families can come
and simply read together.
Kaldenberg worked
with the district to bring
D.E.A.R. to Lakeview
Elementary. Each year,
the event attracts over
100 students and their
parents.
She’s also collaborated
with high school science
teacher Dawn Posekany
to create a community
book reading, where
students and a local
book club will read the
same book. The group
then meets at the public
library, and the students
facilitate a discussion
about the book and its
relevant subject matter.
“Kathy has been our
district’s secret weap-
on,” Posekany said. “Her
leadership has turned
learning and collabo-
rating into an anytime,
anywhere possibility for
staff and students.”
Like Posekany, Kald-
enberg became many
teachers’ go-to person for
ideas and inspiration.
“Kathy’s accessibility
and willingness to jump
into unknown territory
were welcoming,” Poseka-
ny said.
All of this relates to
what Kaldenberg calls
“the theme” to her time
here at Solon: connect-
ing. She calls herself a
connector, someone who
brings ideas and people
together.
Kathy is quick to point
out that all that connect-
ing would not be possible
without the support of
the staff from all of the
schools, especially from
her three fellow media
specialists at each of the
schools; Paula Day at
Lakeview, Shari Butter-
field at Solon Middle
School and Heather Penti-
co at Solon High School.
“If I see things that
people are interested in,
I’m going to tell them
about it. I’m going to say
‘this is HOW it connects
to what you’re doing,”
Kaldenberg said. “I really
saw that as what I did
well.”
Kaldenberg: Continued from page 11
NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY • APRIL, 2015 • 19
If interested, please submit your resume and an applicaƟon
found at www.southslope.com/content/careers
to jobs@southslope.com
MulƟ-FuncƟon
Plant Worker
Outside Plant (two posiƟons available)
Monday through Friday,
8:00am – 4:30pm shiŌ
RESPONSIBILITIES:
Demonstrate ability to work with the South Slope Outside Plant team
members and our customers. Areas of focus include but are not limit-
ed to: installaƟon and repair of phone, internet, and television services
for residenƟal and business customers; ability to locate underground
faciliƟes; installaƟon and proper terminaƟon of various categories of
inside wiring and fiber opƟcs. Ability to troubleshoot South Slopes
network and equipment to ensure Ɵmely isolaƟon and resoluƟon of
problems. This posiƟon plays an important role in assisƟng with plans
for growing service take rates and assessing customer feedback.
REQUIRMENTS:
• Experience with tradiƟonal POT service, phone systems,
and CAT5/fiber wiring installaƟon and terminaƟon.
• Deliver outstanding customer service and contribute
to a sales culture.
• Must have core values: respect for others, pro-acƟve,
strong wriƩen and verbal skills, responsible, trustworthy,
and must follow safety procedures at all Ɵmes.
• Clean driving record and have or obtain a CDL-A license.
• Customer oriented and driven to provide service 24/7.
• Ability to work various hours, different shiŌs and be on
call, work in a union environment.
• Ability to work in extreme weather condiƟons is a must.
Qualified applicants have the opportunity to make over $23.00
per hour. South Slope offers an impressive benefits package in-
cluding a company funded pension plan and 401K plan, as well as
discounted South Slope services and medical, vision, and dental
insurance.
South Slope is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
IT Support
Specialist
TIER 1
South Slope is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
RESPONSIBILITIES:
IT Support Specialist provides Tier I technical support to customers by
troubleshooƟng and isolaƟng customer premise equipment. Responsi-
ble for service assurance for all first level network troubleshooƟng for
phone, internet, and television service, as well as the last mile transport
to customer demark and DSLAM provisioning. Support exisƟng and new
customers by serving as primary technical support for repair issues.
Work closely with InstallaƟon and Repair Technicians, Customer Service
RepresentaƟves, and other internal team members for electronic trouble
Ɵckets and escalaƟons. Other duƟes assigned.
If interested, please submit your resume and an applicaƟon
(found at www.southslope.com/careers) to jobs@southslope.com
• College degree, technical cerƟ-
ficaƟon, or 2+ years related work
experience in telecommunicaƟon
industry.
• Network+ cerƟficaƟon. Candi-
dates hired for this posiƟon with-
out cerƟficaƟon will be required
to acquire it within six months of
accepƟng the posiƟon.
• TelecommunicaƟon experience
preferred, specifically in phone,
internet, and television.
• Knowledge of Tier I mainte-
nance and/or surveillance of data
network.
• Knowledge of access DSLAMs,
modems, set top boxes, routers,
wireless devices, remote controls,
video equipment provisioning,
etc.
• Experience in troubleshooƟng
media layers of OSI model, layers
1-3, physical, MAC addressing,
Qualified applicants have the opportunity to make over $31.00 per
hour for this shiŌ. South Slope offers an impressive benefits package
including a company funded pension plan and 401K plan, as well as dis-
counted South Slope services and medical, vision, and dental insurance.
and network TCP/IP.
• Logical and analyƟcal approach
to troubleshooƟng issues.
• Proven track record with trou-
bleshooƟng issues and providing
technical leadership.
• Must have focus, organizaƟon,
and strong verbal and wriƩen
communicaƟon skills.
• Work well with supervisors,
coworkers, and customers.
• Proficiency in MicrosoŌ Offi ce
Suite.
• ApƟtude to exercise flexibility
and resourcefulness (with assis-
tance from others) in challenging
or perplexing situaƟons.
• Ability to work on-call rotaƟon,
overtime, rotating schedules,
weekends, holidays and call-
outs as a condiƟon of employ-
ment, based on the needs of
the business.
REQUIREMENTS:
Monday-Friday, 11:30am-8:00pm shiŌ
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WE HAVE CUSTOMERS LOOKING FOR
Any home with lake views • Acreages or acreage lots • In-town Solon properties
Member of both Cedar Rapids
and Iowa City Area MLS
319-624-6027
NEW LISTINGS! SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS!
1425 HWY 1 NE, Solon NEW 2-Story 3 bed / 1.5 bath $289,000
139 38th St. NE, CR NEW Ranch 2 bed / 1.5 bath $114,900
1628 Richmond Rd. NE, CR NEW Ranch 3 bed / 1.5 bath $124,900
484 2nd Street, Fairfax NEW Ranch/Condo 4 bed / 3 bath $214,900
7115 York Avenue, Marion NEW Ranch 3 bed / 2 bath $214,900
450 2nd Street, Fairfax NEW Ranch Condo 2 bed / 2 bath $192,500
CALL TO SEE LOTS & LAND
Limestone Estates, Anamosa LOTS $74,925-$129,900 Choose from several attractive building sites from 6 to 10 acres.
170th Street, Riverside LAND $399,000 40 Acres M/L. Mature timber and pasture with food plots. Hunter’s dream.
Lot 2 S. Market Street, Solon LOT $109,000 Nice commercial lot which features excellent Highway 1 visibility.
Lot 16 Macbride Estates, Solon LOT $82,900 Concrete roads, mostly walkout lots, lake and pond views.
3365 Mohawk Road, Solon LOT $295,000 Super nice. 10 acres with mature trees, pond.
65 Acres Wayland Road, Wayland LAND $349,900 37 acres tillable estimated @ 60+ CSR average, and 28 acres of pasture
CEDAR RAPIDS 139 38th Street NE 2 / 1.5 Ranch $114,900
CEDAR RAPIDS 1628 Richmond Road NE 3 / 1.5 Ranch $129,900
CORALVILLE 1928 Holiday Road 4 / 3 Ranch $224,900
FAIRFAX 484 2nd Street 4 / 3 Ranch Condo $214,900
MARION 7115 York Avenue 3 / 2 Ranch $214,900
SOLON 404 N. Iowa Street 2 / 1.5 Townhouse Condo $74,900
SOLON 3716 Cottage Reserve Road 4 / 2 Ranch $299,000
SOLON 416 Serenity Court 5 / 3.5 Two-Story $397,500
SOLON 3875 Lake Vista Drive 5 / 4.5 Two-Story $1,820,000
CALL TO SEE BED/BATH STYLE PRICE
Legacy Developers New Energy Efficient Homes
Priced from $192,500-$214,900
Model: 484 2nd Street, Fairfax
PRAIRIE CREEK CONDOS
Starting at $214,900
Model: 7115 York Ave., Marion
PRAIRIE RIDGE HOMES
Johnson County Operation Embrace
wants to know: when was the last
time you hugged a veteran?
IOWA CITY– Organizers are preparing to launch a
county-wide effort called Johnson County Operation
Embrace, in hopes of enlisting the community to offer
a personal investment back to those who have invest-
ed in the country’s freedom. The idea is to encourage
people to thank veterans for their service, specifically
with a hug when possible, to show appreciation in a
meaningful way.
While the effort is still in the planning stages, an
informational video will soon appear on the Johnson
County Operation Embrace Facebook page. Orga-
nizers will announce upcoming activities centered
around the theme, including a kick-off event planned
for Memorial Day weekend. Watch future editions of
the North Liberty Leader, Solon Economist and North
Johnson County newspapers for additional informa-
tion.
REACH OVER 13,000 HOMES BY ADVERTISING
IN NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
I knew offhand was helpful to discussions with council
members or staff,” Long said. His initial judgment is that
Tiffin has done extremely well managing the growth pres-
sure, especially in the last year.
“There has evolved a good team between staff and
council and the consultants– the engineer and the attorney.
It appears to be working pretty well,” he said. “It really
takes a team.”
Long doesn’t expect the demand for new development
will fizzle in Tiffin any time soon. He attended a breakfast
meeting of the Tiffin Community Foundation on Feb. 24,
and heard people wish for more commercial and retail
service opportunities.
“That’s a challenge any time you have a high-growth
community out of a small farm town. That, and to try to
maintain that small town feel. The two are difficult to get
done at the same time,” said Long.
Long is not required to reside in Tiffin, so he will con-
tinue to commute to his home in Davenport during his in-
terim tenure. The council approved Long’s contractual pay
at $35 per hour for 40 hours per week without benefits.
Long said though he is here for a short time, he is happy
to field questions and concerns from the public. Call him at
319-545-2572, email him at cityadministrator@tiffin-iowa.
org, or just drop by.
“There may be times when I don’t have much time, but
I will say so, and I don’t mind setting an appointment for
someone to stop by later. My door is open 95 percent of
the time,” Long said.
Tiffin interim: Continued from page 9
20 • APRIL, 2015 • NORTH JOHNSON COUNTY
WWW. SOL ONECONOMI ST . COM OR WWW. NORT HL I BERT YL EADER. COM
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it’s the same
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been delivering
for over 15 years.
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are available on
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either the Solon
Economist or North
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AND 1998 PRICING
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LEADER
NORTH LIBERTY
NorthLibertyLeader.com
HOME
SPRING
APRI L 2015
A Special Supplement to the
North Johnson County Newspaper
Top Ten Reasons to have us take care of your pest control needs:
We are now expanding
our services in your area
Call Chris direct @ 319-826-4499
www.dennyspestcontrol.com
COMING SOON TO YOUR HOME:
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Cockroaches, Crickets, Fleas, Mice, Spiders, Wasps and more.
DENNY’S CAN GET RID OF THEM FOR YOU.
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TERMITE INSPECTIONS
TERMITE CONTROL
PEST CONTROL
BY LORI LINDNER
RURAL AMANA– When rural Amana
farmer Leonard Kloubec would take fish-
ing trips with his son Myron in the 1970s,
they weren’t always the typical father-son
fishing expeditions.
“We’d put barrels in the back of a
pick-up and go to Arkansas to get small
catfish,” said Myron, where they could get
a few thousand fish to stock their farm
pond. And since they would sometimes
return with 20,000 three-inch catfish– or
fingerlings– they had enough to share
with other farmers in the area who also
wanted to stock private waters. Some of
the fingerlings would go into the Klou-
becs’ pond, and others would briefly go
into a livestock tank until a neighbor could
haul them to a more natural habitat.
Recognizing an unfulfilled market for
pond stock, Leonard expanded his op-
eration into a small side business.
What started as little more than Leon-
ard’s hobby has grown into a third-gen-
eration alternative agricultural business
that Myron, along with wife Ellen, son
and daughter-in-law Nick and Holly,
and sales manager Amy Schuerer now
operate from the family-owned, century
farm between Swisher and Amana, just
off 140th St. NW.
They have come a long way from
stocking a few catfish.
Kloubec Fisheries and Kloubec Koi
Farm together constitute one of the three
largest fisheries in the United States.
The Kloubecs’ goal– maybe even ob-
session is an apt term here– is to provide
customers with the absolute healthiest,
highest-quality specimens, fish feed and
pond care equipment and water treat-
ment supplies found anywhere.
“We use them here on the farm,” said
Schuerer. “ We know they work. When
people do buy our fish we try to encour-
age them to use products we know will
work, as a safeguard.”
More than 50 ponds span the Klou-
becs’ 80-acre farm, where game fish like
catfish and crappie, bluegill, bass, wall-
eye and grass carp are spawned each
year fill to everything from farm ponds
to recreational lakes.
In the past, farmers were able to get
free stock fish from the Iowa Department
of Natural Resources (DNR). However,
last month the DNR ended its pond-stock-
ing program to private citizens. Though
a very popular program, the DNR’s
decision was to invest in resources that
promote fishing opportunities statewide.
That was good news for private fisher-
ies like the Kloubecs’.
“We are an agriculture business, and
nobody gets free feeder pigs or cattle to
stock their (livestock) farms, so we saw
it as an unfair advantage,” Myron said.
In building a backyard pond, stocking it
is actually the least expensive part, he
added.
Just as any homeowner who desires
a pond for recreation, agriculture or aes-
thetic enjoyment, Kloubecs must start at
the ground level, literally.
Nick is in charge of Kloubec Earth-
works, and uses his earth moving equip-
Fishing for a backyard pond?
SALES • SERVICE • SHEET METAL WORK • NEW CONSTRUCTION • REPLACEMENT
115 Southgate, Iowa City, IA 52240
319-351-0054
FREE ESTIMATES ON NEW EQUIPMENT
KLOUBEC FISHERIES CAN HELP
KLOUBEC FISHERIES
Continued on page 6
SPRING HOME
2 nojoco APRIL 2015
319-665-2191
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The flowers are blooming, and the
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to landscaping. Those who aren’t
looking forward to dusting off their
lawnmowers and rethreading their
string trimmers may want to hire pro-
fessional landscapers to tend to their
lawns and gardens.
A recent joint study by the National
Gardening Association, Residential
Lawn and Landscape Services and
the Value of Landscaping found that
homeowners spend roughly $45
billion per year on professional lawn
and landscape services, as nearly 30
percent of all households across the
United States use at least one type of
lawn or landscape service. The rising
use of lawn care services is indicative
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fessional services can provide. While
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TIME SAVINGS
One of the biggest benefits of leav-
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during the spring and summer sea-
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more. Add the time it takes to clean
up clippings, mulch landscaping beds
and edge the property, and homeown-
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Maintaining a landscape is hard
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On the surface, hiring a landscap-
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learning process. Each year, new
seed, fertilizer, mulch, pesticides,
and other supplies also must be pur-
chased. But professional lawn care
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maintenance of both your property
and the equipment needed to keep
that property looking great.
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Many professional landscapers
know how to address lawn care issues
that may arise throughout the year.
They will know how to deal with dry
patches of lawn or poorly draining
areas, and they also can make recom-
mendations on plants that will thrive
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Certain landscaping services pro-
vide many different options for pro-
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may be services for seasonal seeding,
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Time saved and a professional job are just two of the reasons homeown-
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hiring a landscaper
THE MANY BENEFITS OF
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Homeowners who frequently travel
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Established weekly schedules ensure
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Spring is a great time for home-
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BY JEN MOORE
SOLON ECONOMIST
SOLON– Walking into his parents’ hardware store,
Tom Trump wasn’t quite prepared for the display of
pink step stools, toolboxes and tools that greeted
him in the front window. It seemed out of place for a
store that sold lawn mower parts, plumbing supplies
and other home improvement tools.
Immediately, he knew this was his mother, Car-
olyn’s, doing.
“What are you going to do with that?” he recalled
asking her.
But Carolyn held her tongue, as she always did
whenever her son or late husband, Dean, ribbed her
about her product or display choices. She would let
the store’s sales do the talking.
“And I’ll be damned if she didn’t sell the snot out
of them,” Tom admitted.
In the 40 years Solon Trustworthy Hardware has
been in business, Carolyn Trump had always had
an innate ability to know what customers wanted,
whether her family liked to admit it or not.
She recalled a time years ago, when her hus-
band thought she wasn’t paying attention, and told
a friend in a hushed voice that his wife had “an
inborn talent of knowing what people will want to
buy.” He added that he did his best to not interfere
with her work.
And though there were plenty of opportunities
for Carolyn to gloat, not once, since the family
purchased the store in 1975, did she ever say, “I
told you so.”
Carolyn was born and raised in Lisbon, while
Dean was from Mechanicsville. They met, married,
moved to Cedar Rapids and, after giving up on the
idea of having children, were blessed with Tom.
Dean had always worked in the industrial field and
his goal was to work his way up to management. He
was a hard worker and what Carolyn calls “a self-
made man.” Though he never went to college, he
finally achieved his dream of making it up the ladder.
Except there was one problem: he hated it.
One night, Carolyn approached her husband and
asked him “Dean, if you had a choice, what would
you really like to do with the rest of your life?”
He thought for a moment and replied, “Well, if
you’re game, I’d like to open a hardware store.”
Without hesitation, Carolyn agreed and the pro-
cess of finding the perfect location began. They
looked at several possible places around Iowa and
finally settled on Solon. They felt it was in an advan-
tageous location, situated between Iowa City and
Cedar Rapids, and liked that it had an apartment
right above the shop that the family of three could
move into.
But that didn’t mean running the store was with-
out its challenges. When the couple purchased the
shop it was “a lot of blue sky,” both Tom and Carolyn
said. The inventory basically had to be rebuilt from
scratch, which was a daunting task for two new
business owners.
But in some ways, Carolyn felt it was almost an
advantage. It meant they could stock it with what-
ever they thought would be most profitable and
they could get input from customers about what
they wanted most.
Dean purchased products from a hardware distrib-
utor in Cedar Rapids, but if customers came to his
store and couldn’t find what they wanted, he would
pick it up in Cedar Rapids along with the rest of his
order. If enough people requested an item, it was
permanently added to the list.
And though it’s a small store, the owners also
made sure they stocked all the parts for every piece
of equipment they sold, so a customer could come
in, fix a lawn mower and mow the grass all in the
same day.
“People would call and just be flabbergasted
that we stocked parts and didn’t have to order it,”
Tom said. “That’s something I noticed in the last
10 years.”
The couple also added more services to the
store once they took over. Instead of just selling
parts and supplies, they did plumbing repairs and
maintainence, lawn mower repairs, and, eventually,
window installation.
This would become the shop’s bread and butter
and one of the biggest reasons, Tom said, for why
the store is still so successful, despite the growing
popularity of big box stores like Menards or Lowes.
“Over the years we noticed the small hardware
stores that just tried to live off what they sold didn’t
do as well as those that did other services,” Tom
said. “We call that bringing money in the back door.”
Tom, Carolyn, and their small staff take time to
teach customers how to use their products, instead
of just sending them on their way once the purchase
is made. They also offer
free pick up and delivery
for all mower repairs.
Though t he st or e
stopped doing plumb-
ing repairs when Dean
passed away, Tom has
kept up with the other
services. He became
an expert after years of
learning from his father.
Tom was 11 when
his parents purchased
the hardware store and
since day one he was a
fixture in the shop. He
would help his mother
take i nventory, mark
prices and assist with
the day-to-day activities.
Once Tom was ol d
enough, Dean began
teaching him more about
the repair side of things,
though he recalls his
father havi ng a very
particular and some-
times frustrating method
of teaching. Instead of
showing Tom how things
were done, it would be
Carolyn Trump (right) with her son, Tom Trump. The two own
Solon Trustworthy Hardware, which Carolyn bought in 1975
with her late husband, Dean Trump. (photo by Jen Moore)
Solon Trustworthy Hardware
CELEBRATES 40 YEARS OF BUSINESS
SOLON HARDWARE
Continued on page 5
SPRING HOME
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up to Tom to pay attention and watch
how his father did things. And though
he might ask Tom for his opinion on
how to do a particular repair, Tom
soon learned that it was better just to
keep quiet.
“When I would tell him what I thought
we should do, he would always pick
the other way,” Tom said. “So I learned
to say, ‘I don’t care, [do it] however
you want to do it. If I did that then nine
times out of 10 we’d do it the way I
wanted.”
However, disagreements never last-
ed too long between the two of them.
Both father and son were volunteer
firemen and once the next call came
in, the two were back to normal.
After years of working together, Tom
and Carolyn have also perfected a
system to keep from getting on each
other’s nerves.
They adhere to the rule of never of-
fering unsolicited advice (or if you do,
make sure to leave the room quickly)
and only give help when asked.
For example, Tom knows his mother
is a whiz at varnishing and staining
wood and he has no problem asking
her for a hand. But for the most part
the two have their own separate,
but equally important roles; Caro-
lyn makes sure the store is running
smoothly while Tom takes care of the
service end.
Their perfected roles have allowed
the hardware store to become a Solon
staple, one where a family of out-of-
towners have become some of the
most well-known people in the area,
something not everyone originally
thought was possible.
“We had one guy who was rather
boastful and told Dean, ‘you’ll never
make it in this town’…that man lived
to eat his words,” Carolyn said, and
then finally admitted to the one time
she actually offered a mild “I told you
so” moment.
“And that I did kind of gloat on it to
my husband.”
SOLON HARDWARE
Continued from page 4
SPRING HOME
6 nojoco APRIL 2015
the property’s soil and watershed char-
acteristics.
Yes, even the type of dirt makes a
difference.
In fact, it’s the clay-heavy soil on the
Kloubecs’ farm that offered ideal condi-
tions for them to develop their specialty
of breeding, raising and selling koi– those
multi-colored, ornamental carp that orig-
inated in the rivers of Central Asia and
now grace outdoor ponds and water
gardens around the globe.
With latitude similar to that of Niigata,
Japan where koi were first developed
and continue to be bred, the Amana-area
farm imitates the fishes’ original natural
environment. The mud on the Kloubecs’
farm is closer to the composition of the
mud in Japan than in any other U.S.
location, information obtained through
many scientific soil comparisons. The
fish raised on Kloubecs’ farm are not
only hardy, but their specialized ponds
produce fish with beautiful colors and
patterns not always found in fish bred
elsewhere in this country.
While game fish are also sensitive
to their environment, raising koi is an
aquaculture endeavor unlike any other.
Kloubecs sell to wholesalers like garden
centers or commercial facilities across
the country and into Canada, but also
to discerning pond owners, high-end
collectors and competitive fish show
enthusiasts.
“We hatch up to 15 million koi annual-
ly,” said Ellen. “Everything is selectively
bred, artificially spawned and the eggs
are incubated in our hatchery. It’s a very
a pond’s function.
“You have to make
sure the soil is right,
to make sure it holds
water. And usually it
has to be at least 10
feet deep to keep fish
over the winter,” said
Nick. “We do test soil
to make sure it is right.”
Nick’s deep knowledge
of the earth is important to pond
construction, as he is able to recommend
the appropriate size, depth, location
and spillway system that meets the
homeowner’s needs and works best for
Call Sugar Bottom Farms today
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ment and years of pond expertise to help
clients locate and construct a healthy
pond. He can build or repair levees,
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KLOUBEC FISHERIES
Continued from page 1
KLOUBEC FISHERIES
Continued on page 7
SPRING HOME
7 nojoco APRIL 2015
Game fish are available mid-April
through May, and again in the fall.
Customers who place orders can
pick fish up during the
Spring Open House Friday, April
17 and Saturday, April 18.
Excavation inquiries;
www.kloubecearthworks.com
KLOUBEC FISHERIES
kloubecfisheries.com
KLOUBEC KOI FARM
kloubeckoi.com
KLOUBEC EARTHWORKS
kloubecearthworks.com
1375 Baxter Ave. NW
Amana, IA 52203
319.846.2077
110 North Columbus Street
West Liberty, IA 52776
102 Cedar St
Tipton, IA 52772
4179 Naples Ave
Iowa City, IA 52240
www.hdclineco.net
109 East Main Street
West Branch
Ken & Helen
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319-430-2391 ~ 319-430-2189
Spring is a great time to Buy or Sell!
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· Beautiful views
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· Well suited for orchard, vineyard or conven-
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complicated process.”
It’s also very time-consuming and la-
bor-intensive. During the spawning sea-
son, Ellen and Myron often work around
the clock. Female fish only spawn, or
release eggs, one time a year, so the
window of opportunity can’t be missed.
When babies hatch they are the size of
mosquito larvae. They go into a sepa-
rated nursery pond that is first cleaned,
refilled, fertilized and infused with plank-
ton for the tiny fry.
“Then you hope they survive,” said
Ellen. Temperature, natural predators
and weather conditions can all impact
spawning success.
There are 13 classes of koi, and each
class has a number of varieties and
sub-varieties, based on body conforma-
tion, markings, coloration, fin types and
other physiological characteristics, as
well as Japanese names. After 20 years
in the koi business and a few trips to
Japan to pick out perfect breeding pairs,
Ellen can not only identify each one,
she is also able to recognize particularly
strong qualities in individual fish that
buyers will find desirable, and therefore
more valuable.
Part of the Kloubecs’ success of its
fishery business is due to the way the fish
are handled. Myron spent years working
with animal nutritionists to develop a bal-
anced, high-quality feed. Over the years,
the Kloubecs have used and now sell
what they consider the best line of food,
pond care products, pumps and aeration
systems that are environmentally safe,
and easy to use, including a wind-pow-
ered aerator for pond farms that have no
other electricity source.
“If you maintain things in the pond and
watch the balance and provide additional
fertilizer, you are going to have better
results with that pond,” Myron said. “You
get out of it what you put into it. You’re try-
ing to keep a live animal that is vulnerable
to mother nature.” The Kloubecs offer
education links on both their websites to
provide information about getting started
and caring for fish, and the staff serve as
an on-going resource when customers
have questions or concerns.
“Every pond is different. We try and
provide as much education as possible,
give our recommendations, and then let
them have the experience of raising fish,”
said Myron.
The koi farm only opens to the public
on Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon for
retail sales or by appointment. Orders are
typically taken over the Internet through
an EBay store or directly from the Klou-
becs’ website, kloubeckoi.com.
Other than pond packages, each
koi is individually photographed and
numbered, so when a customer buys a
specific koi or particular fish online, that
is the exact fish he or she actually gets.
The koi are meticulously cared for
in a state-of-the-art quarantine facility
before they are shipped in special pro-
tective containers to guarantee that fish
arrive– usually overnight– safe, healthy
and with minimal anxiety. Kloubecs’ fa-
cility is certified by the Animal and Plant
Health Inspection Service, a branch of
the USDA.
“You have to have the passion for this,”
said Ellen. “It’s really gratifying for us
KLOUBEC FISHERIES
Continued from page 6
when some of our customers take their
koi to shows and they win awards. We
are just as happy as they are.”
In 2013, the fishery was nominated by
Linn County REC for the Iowa Venture
Award, a recognition given by the Iowa
Area Development Group for the busi-
ness’ significant contribution to the state’s
economy and value added agriculture.
“Our business starts from the excavat-
ing to the stocking. It’s full circle, and not
all hatcheries do that,” said Schuerer.
SPRING HOME
8 nojoco APRIL 2015
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SPRING HOME
9 nojoco APRIL 2015
Call us for information
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319.631.5200 · rindy@Lcom.net
Ed Rinderspacher
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1476 Baker Ave
West Branch
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BY RICHARD JAURON, GREG WALLACE
Iowa State University Extension and Outreach
AMES– With spring here, it’s time to think about
planting in home gardens. In Iowa, onions are a pop-
ular garden product, but they do require some special
conditions and care to get optimal results.
Here are some tips from Iowa State University Ex-
tension and Outreach horticulturists on onion cultivar
varieties and the proper way to plant them. To have
additional questions answered, contact the ISU Hortline
at 515-294-3108 or hortline@iastate.edu.
WHAT IS A SUITABLE PLANTING
SITE FOR ONIONS?
Onions perform best in well-drained, slightly acidic,
fertile soils in full sun. The planting site should receive
at least six hours of direct sun each day. Heavy soils
can be improved by incorporating organic matter,
such as compost, into the soil. Onions require higher
fertility levels than most other vegetables. Apply one
to two pounds of an all-purpose garden fertilizer, such
as 10-10-10, per 100 square feet and till into the soil
prior to planting. Four to five weeks after planting, side
dress with additional fertilizer. Sprinkle one pound of an
all-purpose garden fertilizer per 100 feet of row. Place
the fertilizer in a narrow band about 2-3 inches from the
base of the onion plants.
WHAT ARE SOME GOOD
ONION CULTIVARS FOR IOWA?
Suggested onion cultivars for home gardens in Iowa
include ‘Candy’ (yellow-brown skin, globe-shaped, short
term storage), ‘Copra’ (main season, yellow-brown
skin, excellent storage), ‘Red Burgermaster’ (bright red,
globe-shaped, good storage), ‘Red Zeppelin’ (deep red,
globe-shaped, excellent storage), ‘Stuttgarter’ (flattened
globes, light brown skin, excellent storage, from sets),
ONION CULTIVARS IN SPRING
Prepare & plant
‘Walla Walla Sweet’ (late season, yellow-brown skin,
short term storage) and ‘White Sweet Spanish’ (late
season, white skin, short term shortage).
Which planting method is best when growing onions?
Onions may be grown from seeds, sets (small bulbs)
and plants. Base your planting method on cost, avail-
ability and ease of planting. For most home gardeners,
growing onions from seeds is the most difficult planting
method as germination rates are sometimes poor. How-
ever, it is the least expensive. Seeds of specific onion
cultivars are readily available. Growing onions from sets
is easy. However, specific onion cultivars are usually
not available. Onion sets are typically sold as red, white
or yellow onions. Since the cultivar is unknown, the
flavor, use and keeping quality of onions grown from
sets vary considerably. Growing onions from plants is
the preferred planting method for many home garden-
ers. Onions are easily grown from plants. Additionally,
specific cultivars are available at garden centers.
WHAT IS THE PROPER WAY
TO PLANT ONION SEEDS?
Plant onion seeds as soon as the ground can be
worked in spring (late March or early April in southern
Iowa, early to mid-April in central Iowa and mid to late
April in northern portions of the state). Plant seeds in
rows 12-15 inches apart. Cover the seeds with one-half
to three-quarters inch of soil. When the seedlings are
2-4 inches tall, thin the planting. For large, dry onions,
plants should be spaced 2-3 inches apart after thinning.
A full season of growth is needed for mature onions.
WHAT IS THE PROPER WAY
TO PLANT ONION SETS?
Before planting sets, separate the bulbs into two size
groups - those smaller than a nickel in diameter and
those larger than a nickel. The larger sets often bolt
(produce a flower stalk) and don’t produce good-sized
bulbs. Use the larger sets for green onions. The small-
er sets can be allowed to develop into mature onions.
Plant sets from early April to early May. Sets should be
planted at a depth of 1 to 1 1/2 inches in rows 12-15
inches apart. For dry onions, plant the sets 2-3 inches
apart. Sets grown for green onions can be planted
closer together.
WHAT IS THE PROPER WAY
TO PLANT ONION PLANTS?
Plant onion plants from early April to early May. Place
plants 1 to 1 1/2 inches deep in rows 12-15 inches
apart. To produce large, dry onions, space plants 2-3
inches apart.
SPRING HOME
10 nojoco APRIL 2015
West Branch Treasures
1767 275th Street
West Branch Iowa
Hours:
Thursdays 9-7, Fridays 8-5,
Saturdays 8-5
2 miles north of Interstate 80, Exit 259
319-643-2808 or 319-631-1500
The rejuvenating spirit of spring makes this be-
loved season an ideal time for homeowners to take
stock of their homes and properties and address
any issues that arose during the winter. While some
homes make it through winter unscathed, the harsh
weather of the year’s coldest season can add sev-
eral tasks to homeowners’ springtime to-do lists.
While some projects are best left to the pro-
fessionals, others can be tackled even by those
homeowners with little or no DIY experience. The
following are a handful of projects tailor-made for
spring.
INSPECT THE GUTTERS
Gutters tend to bear the brunt of harsh winter
weather, and come spring gutters are in need of
inspection if not repair. Winter winds, snow and
heavy rainfall can compromise the effectiveness of
gutters, which can easily accumulate debris and de-
tach from homes during winter storms. In addition,
gutters sometimes develop leaks over the winter
months. As a result, homeowners should conduct a
careful inspection of their gutters come the spring,
being sure to look for leaks while clearing the gutters
of debris and reattaching gutters that might have
become detached from the home on windy winter
days and nights. When reattaching loose gutters,
make sure the downspouts are draining away from
the foundation, as gutters that are not draining
properly can cause damage to that foundation and
possibly lead to flooding.
TAKE STOCK OF ROOF SHINGLES
Much like its gutters and downspouts, a home’s
roof can suffer significant damage over the course
of a typical winter. Shingles may be lost to harsh
SPRING HOME
10 nojoco APRIL 2015
winter winds and storms, so homeowners should
examine the roof to determine if any shingles were
lost (lost shingles might even be lying around the
property) or suffered damage that’s considerable
enough to require replacement. Summer can be
especially brutal on shingles, especially those that
suffered significant damage during the winter. If left
unchecked or unaddressed, problems with dam-
aged shingles can quickly escalate into larger issues
when spring rains and summer sun inevitably arrive,
so homeowners should prioritize fixing or replacing
damaged shingles as quickly as possible.
CHECK FOR FREEZE DAMAGE
Frozen temperatures can be hard on humans and
homes alike, but unlike humans who can stay inside
when temperatures dip below freezing, homes are
forced to withstand the elements throughout the
winter. External hose faucets are often susceptible
to freeze damage. To inspect such faucets, turn the
water on and then place a thumb or finger over the
opening of the faucet. If your thumb or finger can
completely stop the flow of water, the pipe where
the water is coming from is likely damaged and will
need to be replaced.
EXAMINE THE LAWN FOR LOW SPOTS
Once a lawn has thawed out, homeowners can
patrol their properties looking for low spots in the
yard or even low spots within spitting distance of the
home’s foundation. Such spots increase the likeli-
hood of flooding. Flooding near a home’s foundation
increases the risk of potentially costly damage,
while low spots on the lawn that go ignored can
make great breeding grounds for insects, including
mosquitoes, when the weather warms up. When
low spots are detected, fill them in with compacted
soil. Compacted soil can prevent spring rains from
flooding a yard or damaging a home’s foundation.
Assessing potential property damage is a rite of
passage for homeowners in the spring. Though
some damage is significant, oftentimes even novice
DIYers can work their homes and properties back
into shape in time to enjoy spring and summer.
PERFECT FOR SPRING
Home projects
Each spring, homeowners should inspect their
gutters to ensure the gutters are still attached to
their homes and free of debris.
3230 Sandy Beach Rd NE, Solon
11 acres, custom built, grand two
story open foyer entrance, main
floor master, laundry, sunroom and
lots of extras! Convenient location
and spacious upscale home! Not
a drive by! $550,000!
3264 Lake View Dr NE, Solon
Water front! Lake Front! WOW!
The kitchen she has always
dreamed of, garage spaces he will
love and wonderful setting make
this over 2100’ ranch a MUST SEE!
Not a drive by, motivated sellers,
new price, Now $489,000!
732 S Market, #5, Solon
Main floor 2 bed, 2 bath condo, full
kitchen, sunroom, laundry, indoor
mailboxes, free community room use
is great for large family gatherings,
55 plus makes for quiet! Why wait?
Care free living, let someone else do
the work, time to enjoy life!
58 Lakeside, Solon
Wide open Lake Views here! Dock
option, short walk to the water, and
well maintained, updated home!
What are you waiting for, enjoy your
morning coffee here! $289,000!
433 S Iowa, Solon
Large yard with gazebo, fire pit,
extra garage and gardens! 3 Large
bdrms, 2 baths, rec room with
wood burner, can’t beat the loca-
tion for convenience to all school
buildings in Solon! $219,000
1510 Rock Island Dr, Ely
Two story 3 bed, 2.5 bath home
with great yard in Ely! Updated,
rec room, good sized db attached
garage, large double deck, patio,
better look today! $189,000!
NEW LISTING!
Mary Hadenfeldt 319-560-3965
www.MaryHaden.com
Proud & grateful to be providing
Real Estate services to our community.
Hadenfeldt . . . a
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Licensed Realtor in the State of Iowa
Your Solon & Lake Area Specialist
Spring into a new home!
MACBRIDE POINTE Skogman’s newest development in Solon!
Macbride Pointe, 3 miles west of Solon offers quality built Skogman homes of the custom
plan YOU CHOOSE! Pick your lot now while the selection is still great! For more informa-
tion contact Mary Hadenfeldt 319.560.3965; or Amy Eaton 319.981.5784 Today!
Studio h2o Warehouse
Showroom of Plumbers Supply
2020 S. Riverside Dr. Iowa City. IA
319-338-8275
ONE DAY
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Single and combination items available!
Faucets, sinks, toilets, tubs, vanities, showers, valves, showerheads,
hand showers, grab bars, towel bars, and more!
SPRING HOME
11 nojoco APRIL 2015
General Home/Business
Maintenance & Handyman
Repair Service
Tom Dunn 319.333.8828 • Solon e-mail: corridorhome.td@gmail.com
CORRIDOR
HOME
services
REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE
Washers and dryers, ranges,
dishwashers, trash compactors,
garbage disposals.
All brands including Kenmore, Whirlpool,
Frigidaire, Maytag, Amana, LG, Samsung,
Electrolux, Craftsman, KitchenAid.
INSTALLATION
AND REPAIR
Interior blinds,
shades, shutters
and drapes.
INSTALLATION AND ASSEMBLY
OF ANYTHING FOR THE HOME
Including furniture, flat screen T.V.s, lighting
fixtures/ceiling fans, decorations, grills, toys, etc.
CARPENTRY WORK
Serving the Corridor with
Honesty, Expertise & Skill
15 Years Experience
Excellent References
Insured
All brands including
Hunter Douglas, Graber,
Levelor, Norman,
Shade-O-Matic, Bali.
No job too big or too small, provide me your home improvement wish list!
“I can do all things through CHRIST who
strengthens me” PHILIPPIANS 4:13
Open 8-5 Monday-Saturday
(Not available to serve on Sunday)
Tom Dunn
SOLON
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319.665.6500
Just off I-380 at Exit 4 • 645 Penn Ct. North Liberty
Monday 8-8
Tuesday-Friday 8-6
Saturday 8-3
58
CORALVILLE– Come out and enjoy
spring at Forever Green’s Spring Open
House days, from April 17 through 19 at
125 W. Forevergreen Rd., on the south
edge of North Liberty. There will be
free kids’ activities, baby farm animals,
full greenhouses, sales throughout the
store and a chance to win door prizes.
Feeding times for the baby farm
Forever Green Garden Center to host its 2015 Spring Open House April 17 through April 19
bottle feed the babies.”
Hershberger estimated 1,000 people
attended last year’s open house, and
now with new activities, she expects
even more.
This year the open house includes
a fundraiser for Colin Waddick and his
family. Colin, a landscape designer at
Forever Green, was diagnosed with a
complex form of Leukemia last fall. He
is now home with his wife and two young
girls recovering from a bone marrow
transplant. There will be a raffle, bake
sale, bouncy house and an opportunity
to have pictures taken with the animals,
all to raise money to help the Waddicks
with medical and other expenses
This event is not just for kids. Adults
can explore three greenhouses full of
flowers and over two acres of nursery
and display gardens. Professionals will
be on hand to give advice on landscap-
ing, gardening and caring for yards and
gardens.
“Many people are not sure what they
should do this time of year to get ready
for the growing season, so we offer
advice for everyone from first time gar-
deners to those who want to take on a
large do it yourself landscape project”
said Ted Knights, manager of Forever
Green Garden Center. “Of course, the
animals are one of the most popular
activities, so Forever Green will post
feeding times on the website http://
forevergreengrows.com/ and also on
Facebook.
Forever Green owner Lucy Hersh-
berger said the size of the annual event
has increased every year.
“We started with a bottle calf and now
have many different animals: goats,
lambs, ducks, chicks and even Coco
the miniature horse have been here,”
Hershberger said. “The kids love that
they can plant a flower, pet or even help
adults enjoy the animals as much as
the kids do.”
Visit Forever Green on Friday, April 17
from 10 a.m. –4:30 p.m.; Saturday, April
18 from 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m., or Sunday,
April 19 from 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Find
more information at www.forevergreen-
grows.com or call 319-626-6770.
SPRING HOME
12 nojoco APRIL 2015
17 Years Design & Remodeling experience, we can help
make the process easier for you, from start to finish!
Full Service Residential & Commercial
Remodeling & Design Services
www.HomeRepairTeam.com 319-626-HOME(4663) www.HRTBuild-Remodel.com
2698 RESERVOIR DRIVE NW #3 • NORTH LIBERTY
Check us
out on
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with your home again
• Kitchens
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